« Obtaining an identity via soap operas » – Hürriyet Daily News

Even though Hürrem’s ring is the best-selling product in the store, Feriha’s ring and Bihter’s necklace and bracelet are among the best sellers on online shopping sites. (Source: Hürriyet)

« It is a well-known fact that Turkish soap operas are successful both domestically and internationally. But their success is not only limited to TV ratings; many accessories worn by soap opera stars create ‘new trends’ and sometimes ‘identity problems’, according to experts.

Dressing like a soap opera star or having one of the star’s accessories shows an urge to obtain more than one identity, according to Hüsamettin İnanç, scholar and author of the book “The Identity Problems of Turkey.”

This is the result of postmodern culture and changing societal values, he said. “We usually see those problems in the youth in transitional period of the society that we are currently experiencing,” İnanç said, noting that Turkey was experiencing a transition from tradition to modernity.

“Suddenly, we can observe people who are tending to leave a more traditional life behind and are trying to attain a modern one. In this case we see social deviation and ambiguity,” said İnanç, describing what is called “deviant behavior” in social psychology. […]

Those accessories are on sale online from some prestigious jewelry stores and in stores in Kadıköy and Eminönü. “Muhteşem Yüzyıl” (Magnificent Century) character Hürrem’s ring, “Aşk-ı Memnu” (Al Eshq Al Mamnoue) character Bihter’s necklace and bracelet and “Adını Koydum Feriha” (I called her Feriha) protagonist Feriha’s ring can all be found on sale. Some websites even sell such accessories under the title “Accessories from the Magnificent Century” or “Bihter’s exclusive accessories.”[…] » »

Source : Hürriyet Daily News

 

« Dogan offloads Star TV » – C21 media

« Turkish conglom Dogan Media Group has sold entertainment network Star TV to a rival for US$327m.

Dogus Yayin Holdings will take on 99.9% of the channel, which broadcasts entertainment formats, dramas and sport and was Turkey’s first private TV network, subject to local competition clearance.

It will pay Dogan subsidiary Isil Television Broadcasting an initial US$151m, with the outstanding US$176m paid off in instalments over the next two years, according to a filing to the Istanbul Stock Exchange this week.

Dogan originally bought Star for US$306.5m six years ago at a keenly contested auction after previous owner Uzan Media folded in 2003 under the weight of its US$6bn debts.

But it has recently been struggling to cover a multibillion-dollar bill relating to fines, taxes and interest imposed by government, which some commentators have claimed could be politically motivated.

It was forced to sell off Star after failing to comply with new laws prohibiting any one media firm from controlling more than 30% of the advertising market.

Others Dogan assets, including daily newspapers, have already been shed. Kanal D was also on the block but reports today suggest the Star deal may end the sales process.

Meanwhile, Dogus rivals Dogan in terms of scale but its 123 companies are spread across the media, finance, automotive, tourism, real estate, construction and energy industries.

Media arm Dogus Media Group owns news net NTV and has struck partnerships with National Geographic, CNBC and Condé Nast and has more than 1,100 employees. »

Source : C21 media

 

« Doğan Yayın sells Star TV to Doğuş Group for $327 million » – Today’s Zaman

In a written statement released on Monday through the Public Disclosure Forum (KAP), Doğan Yayın said the company had reached an agreement with Doğuş for the sale of Star. “We signed a deal for the sale of our shares in Star TV late on Monday with Doğuş Group,” the statement said. Doğuş will pay $151 million in cash and the remaining $176 million will be paid in 24-month installments to DYH. Doğuş takes over Star from Nov. 1.

Doğan had to pay the Finance Ministry TL 294.2 million in fines levied on the company in 2009 for alleged irregularities in its tax returns. In alleged efforts to raise funds to compensate for the tax fines it had to pay, DYH in April sold its Milliyet and Vatan dailies to the Demirören-Karacan joint venture’s DK Gazetecilik ve Yayıncılık A.Ş. for $74 million. Doğan last year said it would eventually sell all of the companies in its media business, except for the Hürriyet daily, within three months in an attempt to pay off the crippling tax fines. »

Source : Today’s Zaman

« Croissance et environnement culturel » – conférences

« L’association Diversum, sous le de patronage de l’Unesco, organise le premier forum international de l’économie mauve sur le thème Croissance et environnement culturel, du 11 au 13 octobre, à Paris.

L’économie mauve peut être présentée comme une alliance entre culture et économie. Elle prend en compte les enjeux culturels, pour faire de l’économie un vecteur de la richesse et de la diversité culturelle, mais aussi pour faire de l’environnement culturel un enjeu de croissance économique.

Deux enjeux sont au cœur de ce forum : un enjeu éthique et un enjeu économique.

Les journées s’articuleront entre séances plénières et ateliers, sur des sujets tels que les enjeux géopolitiques, l’attractivité des territoires, le tremplin du numérique…

Ce forum se tiendra à l’Espace Pierre Cardin, 1-3, avenue Gabriel, à Paris 8ème.

Cet événement est organisé par Diversum, une association apolitique créée en France en 2006 pour la prise en compte de l’environnement culturel dans les politiques de développement durable.

Contact : Association diversum, 23, rue de Beauvau, 78000 Versailles (+ 33 1 83 64 26 28 – contact@diversum.net ) »

Site internet : http://www.economie-mauve.org

« Des séries et des vies » – revue Labyrinthes n°37

Extrait de l’éditorial par Renaud Pasquier : 

« Jadis on les dédaignait, on les négligeait, on les stigmatisait comme symbole de sous-culture et de mauvais goût, bras armé de l’abêtissement généralisé. Les temps ont bien changé : aujourd’hui, les séries américaines sont portées au pinacle, elles ne sont plus ce plaisir honteux qu’on cachait. Au contraire, il est de bon ton, à tout âge et dans tout milieu, de clamer son admiration pour Les Sopranos, The Wire, Mad Menet bien d’autres, et d’ajouter aux soirées passées devant l’écran les heures de conversation. Enfin les séries suscitent l’écriture, un déferlement de textes, analyses, articles, communications, bien au-delà des cercles de fans ou de journalistes spécialisés, jusque là leur domaine réservé. Les sociologues, les philosophes, les critiques littéraires s’en emparent, en font leur objet de prédilection. Labyrinthesouhaiterait moins s’inscrire dans cette vogue que l’interroger.

Non que nous voulions prendre de la distance, qu’elle soit amusée, accusatrice ou scientifique, avec cet impressionnant engouement ; il ne s’agit en rien de l’objectiver. Au contraire, c’est justement parce que beaucoup d’entre nous sont amateurs assidus de séries que nous voulons comprendre comment et pourquoi elles ont pris tant de place dans nos vies et celles de nos contemporains. Mieux encore, comment elles les ont façonnées, informées, transformées. Non pas donc considérer les séries comme des objets à manipuler à notre guise, calibrées selon concepts et raisonnements préalablement construits, mais mettre en jeu notre expérience de spectateur, et donc inverser les rôles : comment nous devenons les objets des séries, comment elles nous donnent forme, quelles « formes de vie » elles font naître.(…)« 

Source : revue Labyrinthe

« Éditorial », Labyrinthe , 37 | 2011 (2) , [En ligne], mis en ligne le 29 juillet 2011. URL : http://labyrinthe.revues.org/index4210.html. Consulté le 11 octobre 2011.

« Mothers, daughters and real women on Turkish TV » – Hürriyet Daily News

Ebru Özkan (above R) and Feride Çetin, stars of ‘Anneler ile Kızları’ (below) show many TV dimensions of being a woman in their recent series. (Source : Hürriyet)

« The boom in Turkish TV series might have created a whole new economy, but they continue to rely on the cardboard female characters of the soap opera tradition, victims or vixens.

Turkey’s growing economy and its newfound role as a political powerhouse in near regions might be up for dispute, but it sure is moving headstrong in becoming a global superpower in one area: the popularity of its TV series.

The boom in TV series in Turkey the last couple of years has definitely gone out of control. It is almost impossible to find a TV channel not running a series when you sit down with the remote control, save for football. The productions are becoming bigger by the day with their cast ensemble, flashy costumes and set decorations, as well as safe scripts that border on soap opera-like.

The popularity of nearly 100 TV series has crossed borders to the Middle East, the Balkans, the Caucasus and some other Arab countries. Old and new favorites like “Yaprak Dökümü” (Fallen Leaves), “Bir Istanbul Masalı” (An Istanbul Tale), “Gümüş” (Silver) and “Kurtlar Vadisi” (Valley of the Wolves) have found their way into primetime TV in such countries like Iraq, Iran, Bulgaria, Greece, Russia and Kazakhstan.

Turkish TV series have taken over for Brazilian soaps, portraying juxtaposed, glamorous lives in big mansions, as well as the feudal oppression of rural lives. They feature dangerous love stories and power games with all the classic archetypes of a soap opera.

Most soap opera characters entail a non-portrayal of women’s journeys to empowerment and equality and instead support the good old stereotypes that deem women as either victims or vixens.[…] »

Source : Hürriyet Daily News

«  »Turkish TV series a solution for big Greek crisis » – Hürriyet

‘Aşk-ı Memnu’ airs on Greek channel Antenna and competes with ‘Aşk ve Ceza’ on Mega. (source: Hürriyet)

« Two Turkish TV series came to the aid of Greeks who had to leave the nightlife and stay at home because of the big economic crisis.

If 16.5 percent of a country’s population cannot even meet their daily needs, if 24 percent cannot pay their phone and electricity bills, if 19 percent cannot pay their bank credit back, if 9.4 percent cannot pay their rent and if 14 percent cannot even meet the minimum payments on their credit cards, then the situation must be quite dire indeed. […]

People spend their nights before the television screen. Of course the upsurge in the amount of time people spend watching TV carries no meaning for media bosses due to the vertical fall in advertisement revenues. There are only a handful of new domestically produced series. Thus they make do with foreign movies, foreign series and panel discussions.

It is time for Yasemin and war in “Love and Punishment” (Aşk ve Ceza) on Greek channel Mega and Bihter and Behlül in “Forbidden Love” (Aşk-ı Memnu) on Antena. They are racing head to head, according to surveys. The heroes and heroines of these series feature predominantly on the covers of weekly television magazines.

The rage that began with “The Foreign Groom” (Yabancı Damat), expanded with “A Thousand and One Nights” (1001 Gece) and peaked with “Ezel” (Past Eternity) has not vanquished one bit.

When asked why the two big television channels compete with each other through Turkish series, a friend who is well versed in these affairs said the reason was, before anything else, the economic crisis. “If there had been a good Greek series, Turkish series then would not have acquired such high ratings,” he said. “Each part of a Greek series costs around 70,000 to 80,000 euros, whereas each part of a Turkish series costs about 7,000 to 8,000 euros.”

My friend said so many Turkish series had been aired since “The Foreign Groom” that the Greek audience had gotten used to Turkish. “They like Turkish TV series because they do not sound so foreign to their ears anymore. Another factor is that the scenarios of Turkish series are not alien to Greek society. Moreover, high-budget Turkish series are also of good quality.”

I would say “knock on wood” because Turkish series have destroyed many taboos in Greece regarding Turkey and the Turks. »

Source : Hürriyet Daily News

« Mothers, daughters and real women on Turkish TV » – Hürriyet Daily News

Ebru Özkan (above R) and Feride Çetin, stars of ‘Anneler ile Kızları’ (below) show many TV dimensions of being a woman in their recent series. Source : Hürriyet

« The boom in Turkish TV series might have created a whole new economy, but they continue to rely on the cardboard female characters of the soap opera tradition, victims or vixens.

Turkey’s growing economy and its newfound role as a political powerhouse in near regions might be up for dispute, but it sure is moving headstrong in becoming a global superpower in one area: the popularity of its TV series.

The boom in TV series in Turkey the last couple of years has definitely gone out of control. It is almost impossible to find a TV channel not running a series when you sit down with the remote control, save for football. The productions are becoming bigger by the day with their cast ensemble, flashy costumes and set decorations, as well as safe scripts that border on soap opera-like.(…)

The popularity of nearly 100 TV series has crossed borders to the Middle East, the Balkans, the Caucasus and some other Arab countries. Old and new favorites like “Yaprak Dökümü” (Fallen Leaves), “Bir Istanbul Masalı” (An Istanbul Tale), “Gümüş” (Silver) and “Kurtlar Vadisi” (Valley of the Wolves) have found their way into primetime TV in such countries like Iraq, Iran, Bulgaria, Greece, Russia and Kazakhstan.

Turkish TV series have taken over for Brazilian soaps, portraying juxtaposed, glamorous lives in big mansions, as well as the feudal oppression of rural lives. They feature dangerous love stories and power games with all the classic archetypes of a soap opera.(…) »

Source : Hürriyet

« Oh séries chéries! » – HS Les Inrocks

Texte de présentation du Hors-série des Inrocks « Oh séries chéries »  par Olivier Joyard : 

« Il y a eu le cinéma (“Tout le monde a deux métiers : le sien et critique de cinéma”, écrivait Truffaut), puis le foot (“La France compte cinquante millions de sélectionneurs”, se plaignaient Michel Hidalgo et consorts), il y a désormais les séries télé. Depuis dix ans, les anciens feuilletons du dimanche après-midi ont pris la dimension d’un phénomène culturel massif en même temps qu’ils gagnaient en maturité et en diversité. De chaque côté de l’écran, une révélation a eu lieu.

Les séries, invention du XXIe siècle ? Pas vraiment, mais leur perception et leur réalité ont changé. La sériephilie, petite soeur contemporaine de la cinéphilie, fait office de mot de passe générationnel. Les plateformes de streaming sont les nouvelles cinémathèques. De grandes oeuvres sont nées, de The Wire à Friday Night Lights ; il est du dernier chic de passer ses nuits devant l’intégrale A la Maison Blanche ou la saison 1 du Trône de fer ; les colloques universitaires s’épanchent sur la question du genre à travers Glee ou Buffy ; et personne ou presque n’ignore que Don Draper est un garçon compliqué.

L’amour des séries s’incarne sous des formes futiles ou profondes, sentimentales ou intellectuelles. C’est ce spectre inédit, large et organique, que Les Inrocks traversent à l’occasion de ce hors-série. Nous aimons les séries pour la grandeur ou la bêtise d’un personnage, pour la ritournelle d’un générique devenu madeleine (voir notre CD en supplément, qui convoque Angelo Badalamenti ou Lalo Schifrin), pour l’ampleur romanesque d’un récit, ou simplement pour le plaisir de revoir les mêmes visages entrer dans nos vies à répétition. On y découvre de nouveaux continents de fiction, pas seulement anglais ou californiens. On y croise des auteurs tout-puissants, à la liberté créative sans équivalent dans l’entertainment d’aujourd’hui. Pour les meilleures, de The Good Wife à Treme, les motifs sociaux et politiques viennent perturber l’ordonnancement tranquille des épisodes. Les séries déploient un monde de fétiches et d’idées neuves pour spectateurs contemporains jamais rassasiés. Elles supposent aussi un travail acharné dont la France n’a toujours pas trouvé la clef. Le témoignage exceptionnel du scénariste de Prime Suspect, John McNamara, nous plonge dans le quotidien d’une industrie US réactive et organisée pour faire face à l’imprévu. Malgré Engrenages et quelques autres, difficile de trouver une série d’ici vraiment aboutie. Les méthodes de travail américaines, souvent citées en exemple, ne sont pas simples à importer. 

Elles supposent une révolution culturelle qui n’est peut-être pas la solution. Les copies de bonnes séries seront toujours des copies. Dans l’entretien qu’il nous a accordé, l’écrivain Tristan Garcia, grand amateur du genre, diagnostique la fin de l’âge d’or des années 2000, symbolisé par des sommets comme Lost ou Six Feet Under, et l’arrivée des “séries conscientes”, potentiellement prétentieuses et maniéristes. On peut à la fois être d’accord avec lui et considérer que l’époque reste propice à l’émerveillement, même prudent. Les grandes séries continuent d’arriver chaque saison. Opportunité rare, l’histoire du genre se construit désormais en direct pour chacun de nous, et elle est passionnante. L’arrivée massive sur le petit écran des cinéastes, de Gus Van Sant, Martin Scorsese à David Fincher, sans oublier le retour du pionnier Michael Mann, marque un nouveau tournant. Les séries font envie même à ceux qui pensaient ne jamais en avoir envie. Ultime signe des temps. »

Olivier Joyard – Les Inrockuptibles

« Turkey tourism sector buoyed by ‘Arab Spring’  » – Cumhuriyet

« Turkey’s rising regional status in the Arab world swept by popular uprisings against dictatorships is translating into a booming tourism sector at a time of chill in ties with one time ally Israel.

The number of Arab tourists visiting Turkey has dramatically increased over the recent years, making the country a favourite destination in the Arab world, while Israeli tourist numbers have plunged sharply, official data showed. […]

The number of Arab tourists visiting Turkey increased by 16 percent in the first eight months this year, according to the ministry’s statistics.

Istanbul is regarded as one of Turkey’s main tourism destinations as well as Antalya in the Mediterranean.

Some 1.4 million Arab tourists visited Turkey in the period from January to August this year, up from 1.2 million in the same period in 2010 and from nearly 912,000 in 2009.

« We expect to reach 1.7 million Arab tourists in 2011, » said Mehmet Habbab, head of the Turkish-Lebanese Business Council. […]

But another factor is the popularity of Turkish soap operas in the region, with tourists eager to see the Ottoman palaces, ancient sites of Istanbul, and other locations featured in the television series.

« Wherever you go in the Arab world, people talk about Turkish soap operas. Last year Turkey got 67 million dollars in income solely from exporting TV series to Arab countries, » said Habbab.

Source : Cumhuriyet