« Amid Ottoman series row, Gül welcomes history in TV shows » – Today’s Zaman

« Turkish President Abdullah Gül has hailed depictions of history in TV shows and movies, adding his voice to recent debates over whether the depiction of history by artistic circles distorts society’s perceptions about certain historical incidents and figures.

“The fact that historical events or people are being dealt with in movies or TV series is a welcome development,” Gül said during the annual Presidential Grand Awards in Culture and Arts on Thursday.

The president stated that history, especially the Ottoman era, has in recent years become a subject of curiosity and interest for people and that’s why we see historical events and figures being more frequently portrayed in TV series, films and stories.

“It is important to take lessons from history. As the Turkish saying goes, ‘history repeats itself’,” Gül further stated.

The debate on TV shows based on history was sparked by remarks from Prime Minister Recep Tayyip Erdoğan, who severely criticized “Muhteşem Yüzyıl” (Magnificent Century), a historical soap opera on Turkish networks centered on the intrigues of the Ottoman Palace. Those who criticize the series say it portrays şehzades, or the children of the sultan, as indulged only in sensual pleasures.

Erdoğan feels that the series undermines the golden age of Turkish history, as it portrays Ottoman Sultan Süleyman the Magnificent, known as Kanuni in Turkish, who reigned from his coronation in 1520 to his death in 1566, in a way conservatives in Turkey say is skewed.

Erdoğan not only lashed out at the show but also at its producers, as well as the owner of the network that runs it. “We know no such Kanuni. He spent 30 years of his life on horseback [as opposed to the life of indulgence portrayed in the series]. I publicly condemn the directors of that show and the owners of the television station. We have warned the authorities about this. I expect the judiciary to make the right decision.”

The series has been running for two years. Erdoğan and other government representatives have occasionally expressed their annoyance with it, but this was the first time Erdoğan called on the judiciary to act against the show, sparking a major controversy about free speech in Turkey. »

Source : Today’s Zaman

« Ali Ağaoğlu ‘Leyla ile Mecnun’un konuğu oldu » – Sol

Source : Sol

« TRT 1’de yayınlanan “Leyla ile Mecnun” adlı dizinin dünkü bölümünde Ali Ağaoğlu “ti” alındı.

Ali Ağaoğlu’nun at sırtındaki Maslak 1453 reklamı ve ağaç kıyımını merkeze alan “Leyla ile Mecnun” dünkü bölümüyle büyük ilgi çekti. »

Source : Sol

« Turkish PM’s attacks to TV series raise eyebrows » – Hürriyet Daily News

Prime Minister Recep Tayyip Erdoğan. AA photo. Source : Hürriyet

« Prime Minister Recep Tayyip Erdoğan’s heavy criticism Nov. 25 of the hit Turkish TV soap opera “Muhteşem Yüzyıl” (The Magnificent Century) for its portrayal of the Ottoman ruler Süleyman the Magnificent has led to rigorous criticism by members of opposition parties.

Some described Erdoğan’s behavior as an intervention in the judiciary because he had said, “We have alerted the authorities on this, and we wait for judicial decision on it.” Others said the prime minister was mainly trying to divert the country’s agenda.[…]

Tv series and historical facts

“Did it just occur to him now? This TV series has been on the air for more than a year,” Büyükataman told Radikal. “The series should be reviewed in line with historical facts, but I don’t believe in the sincerity of Mr. Prime Minister’s approach.”

Peace and Democracy Party (BDP) deputy parliamentary group chair İdris Balüken said Erdoğan’s main problem was his aspiration to tyrannize over arts and artists, while also intervening in the judiciary as the judiciary itself has already been manipulated by his positions.

“Taking this aspect into consideration, we can estimate the greatness of the danger of an order given to the judiciary for censorship and to take the arts under its control,” Balüken said. »

Source : Hürriyet Daily News

« 100 million dollars brought in from sending turkish shows abroad » – Sabah

« The exporting of Turkish television series to the Middle East and Eastern Europe, which have resulted in the soaring popularity Turkish brands, continues at full-force. Bringing in 100 million dollars in exports this year alone, television shows from Turkey are now selling at higher prices than famous U.S. television series.

According to Customs and Trade Minister Hayati Yazıcı, the peaked interest in Turkish television shows abroad has resulted in turning all eyes on this fast growing sector in Turkey. According to Minister Yazıcı, while statistics show that throughout the globe audio-visual exports saw a 4.54 percent growth on average, in Turkey this year the same figure came to 25.98 percent. Turkish shows are taking the monopoly of prime time spots in a wide variety of locations throughout the Balkans, the Middle East and Central Asia.

Turkey’s entertainment sector has been exporting for five years now. Up until just two years ago, Turkey’s entrance in the market was based on a low-price policy, however now some of the nation’s most popular productions are selling for higher than popular U.S. shows such as Mad Men.

İzzet Pinto, CEO of Global Agency is one of the most prominent businessmen selling Turkish television shows all over the world. According to Pinto, Turkey’s popular sprung to life with television shows such as Bir İstanbul Masalı (An Istanbul Tale), 1001 Gece (1,001 Nights) and Gümüş (Silver). « Today, 100 television stations are being exported to 60 countries. This sector results in bringing in 100 million dollars in foreign currency, » states Pinto.

While Turkish shows are already topping the popularity charts in Middle Eastern and Balkan nations, Turkey now intends to dominate the Western European market. İzzet Pinto explains that they are currently launching in France and if they see success they will go ahead and enter nations such as Italy and Spain.

Western interest in Turkish show

The wind of Turkish shows, which undoubtedly blows strongest in the Gulf nations, has now made its way to the Western European segment, which symbolizes strong economy and high social life standards. For the first time ever, a Turkish television show will soon be released on a Swedish state-run television station.

Considered to be Sweden’s version of Turkey’s TRT, Sveriges Television (STV) will soon be broadcasting the popular television series « Son » (The End) which runs on Atv and stars Yiğit Özşener, Nehir Erdoğan and Berrak Tüzünataç. »

Source : Sabah

 

« TV series criticized by Turkish PM has 150 million viewers, culture ministry says » – Hürriyet

« Turkey’s Culture and Tourism Ministry has responded to the prime minister’s recent suggestion that “Muhteşem Yüzyıl” (The Magnificent Century) was misrepresenting Ottoman history, emphasizing the show’s number large viewership, as well as the general economic benefits of Turkish TV series.

« At the end of 2010 we had $65 mln in export revenue thanks to these T.V. series, » the head of the Intellectual Property Rights Property Rights department of the ministry, Abdullah Çelik, said in a speech at the Trakya University Balkans Congress Center.

« We exported 10,500 hours of T.V. series’ in 2011, however we had no export revenue in 2006, » he said, adding that such series reached 150 million people in 76 countries around the world.

Prime Minister Recep Tayyip Erdoğan dished out heavy criticism on the hit Turkish TV series, “Muhteşem Yüzyıl,” (The Magnificent Century) for its portrayal of the Ottoman ruler Süleyman on Nov. 25. « […]

Source : Hürriyet

« Turkish PM talks Ottoman Empire, slams Turkish TV show  » – Hürriyet Daily News

PM R.T. Erdogan. AA photo. Source : Hürriyet Daily News

« Turkey should follow in its ancestors’ footsteps and go everywhere they have travelled to, the Turkish prime minister said during the opening ceremony of Kütahya Zafer Airport on Nov.25.

“We move with the minds of our Dumlupınar martyrs,” Prime Minister Recep Tayyip Erdoğan said. “We move with the spirit that founded the Ottoman Empire.”

Erdoğan then criticized the opposition for asking “what [Turkey] was doing in Gaza, Syria and Sudan.”

“We must go everywhere our ancestors have been,” Erdoğan said. “We can not take [Atatürk’s philosophy of] peace at home, peace in the world as passivity.”

“We have no eyes on any country’s land,” Erdoğan said. “We want stability in the region as much as we want stability in our homeland. We always side with dialogue to solve problems, but if there is a threat against our country then we will not refrain from taking the necessary precautions. We will not remain silent.”

PM slams Ottoman TV show

In the same speech Erdoğan also dished out heavy criticism on the hit Turkish TV series, “Muhteşem Yüzyıl,” (The Magnificent Century) for its portrayal of the Ottoman ruler Süleyman.

“We alerted the authorities on this and we wait for judicial decision on it,” Erdoğan said. “Those who toy with these values should be taught a lesson within the premises of law.”

Muhteşem Yüzyıl is a popular TV show airing in Turkey and abroad, which follows the lives of the Ottoman ruler Süleyman and his love Hürrem Sultan. The show focuses more on Süleyman’s personal life and palace life, portraying characters from the harem, as well as from the royal family. « 

Source : Hürriyet Daily News

« Behzat Ç. bu kez KCK tutuklularını anlatacak: ‘Hodri meydan, isterseniz bunu yayınlamayın’  » – Sol

« Behzat Ç. » dizisi. Kaynak : Sol

« Behzat Ç.’nin yazarı Emrah Serbes, dizinin 80. bölümünde KCK tutuklularına değineceklerini belirterek, « Hodri meydan. İsterseniz bunu yayınlamayın » dedi.

Star TV’de yayınlanan “Behzat Ç.”nin yazarı Emrah Serbes, 80. bölümde KCK tutuklamalarını ele alacaklarını açıkladı.

“Memleketin Hali” adlı programa konuk olan Serbes, burada yaptığı açıklamada şu ifadeleri kullandı:

“Bize sürekli baskı yapıyorlar. Diziye başladığımızda saat 20.00’de yayınlanıyorduk. Ondan sonra 2’nci sezonda saat 22.00’ye attılar. Bu sezon da saat 23.00’e… Ayrıca ‘13+’ sınırı getirdiler. Ondan sonra sabah kuşağına doğru atacaklar. Bu gidişle Seda Sayan’dan önce yayınlanacağız. Ama bu halk her şeye rağmen izlenmez sanılan dizimizi izliyor.

Şimdi biz 80. bölümde KCK tutuklularına değiniyoruz, bunu yazıyoruz. İsterseniz bunu yayınlamayın. Hodri meydan, yayınlamayın. Ne yapacaksınız, bizi kaldıracak mısınız? Kaldıramazsınız. Seyircimize de söylüyorum, bize sahip çıkın. Eğer yayınlamazlarsa üstüne gidin diyorum.”

Source : Sol

« New period TV series accused of distorting well-known history » – Today’s Zaman

Sami, a major character in the series “Seksenler” (The 80s), is seen in this 2012 photo. (PHOTO SUNDAY’S ZAMAN)

By HATICE KÜBRA KULA

« New period television series launched in an attempt to share the history of the country with viewers, who have tuned in by the millions, have been on the receiving end of harsh criticism after claims that the series distorts the truth about historical events and figures.

The wave of harsh criticisms began with the launch of the TV series “Muhteşem Yüzyıl” (Magnificent Century), which is based on the life of Ottoman Sultan Süleyman the Magnificent and his love for Hürrem Sultan, a former slave who eventually became the sultan’s wife. Critics have argued that the costumes the actors and actresses wear in the series do not reflect the design of the clothing worn by members of the Ottoman dynasty but are rather similar to those used in the historical English TV series “Tudors,” which is about the reign and marriages of King Henry VIII. Also labeled by many as a “fake Tudors,” Magnificent Century has been criticized for its plot, which focuses on the harem life of Süleyman, about which, according to historians, there is no detailed account.

The negative reaction to historical series continued after “Bir Zamanlar Osmanlı: Kıyam” (Once Upon A Time in the Ottoman Empire: Rebellion), a series about significant events that took place in 18th-century Ottoman times such as the Patrona Halil Rebellion, started broadcasting in 2012. Viewers initially said the series, which was launched as a rival to Magnificent Century, was initially devoid of realistic characters and a consistent plot. The series underwent significant changes in the past year, including a change in the plot, and technical problems were also solved by producers.

Other television series such as “Seksenler” (The 80s), which revolves around the lives of people living in the1980s in the aftermath of a bloody coup d’état and “Öyle Bir Geçer Zaman ki” (As Time Goes By), which concentrates on the conflicts among members of a family living in the 1960s, have received similar criticism from historians.

Such series, however, have also revived people’s interest in historical figures and events. There has been a sharp increase in the publication and sale of books about history, according to historians. Women’s demand for accessories and jewelry worn by the main characters of these series has created new market opportunities. Historians have started to hold discussions about the figures and incidents in a number of TV programs with the aim of correcting the mistakes in the period TV series.

Ahmet Yaşar, a lecturer from Fatih University’s department of history, commented on the revival of interest in history through these series, saying they help people gain knowledge about history. However, Yaşar also criticized the series, noting that their producers can make changes or additions to historical events in order to increase ratings, adding that such changes or additions should only be made if there is no exaggeration. Yaşar said most people watch these series as if they reflect historical realities without questioning their authenticity, which makes it more important that they consult factual resources such as history texts.

Another historian, who wanted to remain anonymous, stated that the ideological views of the series’ producers also affect the way the characters and plot are rendered. The historian further commented that such TV series have unfortunately become a part of popular culture.

Followers of TV series, speaking to Sunday’s Zaman, talked about their positive and negative views on such series. Tülin Öksüz, a history gradate, noted that the series most of the time only focus on some particular figures and incidents, failing to talk about the lives of the common people, in which people are interested. Aynur Sezen, a fan of Magnificent Century, stated that the series contributes to her knowledge of history although at times the facts are not correct and events that did not occur in a particular period are depicted, which negatively affects the credibility of the series.

Zeliha Karlı, a housewife, noted that historical facts are merely touched upon with elaboration, which is why she chooses to avoid watching them. “However, I wonder if details about the historic figures and incidents were shared in a factual and detailed manner, would they be watched by as many people?” she said. “It is only the series that are set in more recent history that are credible for me since I know what happened during those times and can decide if the incidents are true or distorted,” noted Karlı. »

Source : Today’s Zaman

« Macedonia bans Turkish soap operas » – Hürriyet Daily News

« Macedonia is currently passing a bill to restrict broadcasts of Turkish TV series during the day and at prime time in order to reduce the Turkish impact on Macedonian society, daily Habertürk has reported.

« Our own programs have started being broadcast after midnight because of Turkish soap operas. On every channel I see a Turkish soap opera like ‘Muhteşem Yüzyıl’ [The Magnificent Century], ‘Ezel,’ or ‘Binbir Gece’ [A Thousand and One Nights]. They’re all fascinating, but to stay under Turkish servitude for 500 years is enough, » Information and Society Minister Ivo Ivanovski said.

Turkish series will gradually be removed and replaced by national programs, according to the new bill. »

Source : Hürriyet Daily News

« ‘It’s not real,’ scholars tell critics of historical dramas » – Hürriyet

Historical dramas, such as ‘Muhteşem Yüzyıl’ (The Magnificent Century), are fictionalized accounts of the lives of sultans rather than historically accurate documentaries, according to academics. Source : Hürriyet

« Academics gather to discuss the increasing popularity of historical TV series in Turkey, noting the distinction between fact and fiction is often misunderstood by audiences. “The fictional side needs much more work because no one knows how a sultan approaches his wife,’ says an academic

It is important for television viewers to understand that historical dramas, such as the wildly popular “Muhteşem Yüzyıl” (The Magnificent Century), are fictionalized accounts of the lives of sultans rather than historically accurate documentaries, according to academics.

“Turkish people confuse the idea of TV series and documentary. A TV series is a different thing than a documentary,” said Erhan Afyoncu, a professor on the board of the Atatürk High Institute of Culture, Language and History, as well as a former consultant for “The Magnificent Century.”

Fictional side

Some have issued criticisms of historical series, Afyoncu said during a recent symposium in the northern province of Tokat, but added that it was difficult to produce such series.

“Historic TV series have a reality side as well as a fictional side,” the former consultant said. “The fictional side needs much more work. You have to create a fiction. You know the political events from history and you stick to this reality when making a TV series. But no one knows how a sultan approached his wife or how he behaved in daily life. This is why you have to fictionalize it. We did it in ‘Magnificent Century.’ There were discussions about sending Süleyman the Magnificent on journeys in the TV series. But I added these journey scenes to the series. But it is interesting that the series had lower ratings in these episodes.” […]

Source : Hürriyet

« ‘It’s not real,’ scholars tell critics of historical dramas » – Hürriyet Daily News

Historical dramas, such as ‘Muhteşem Yüzyıl’ (The Magnificent Century), are fictionalized accounts of the lives of sultans rather than historically accurate documentaries, according to academics.
. Source : Hürriyet

« Academics gather to discuss the increasing popularity of historical TV series in Turkey, noting the distinction between fact and fiction is often misunderstood by audiences. “The fictional side needs much more work because no one knows how a sultan approaches his wife,’ says an academic.

It is important for television viewers to understand that historical dramas, such as the wildly popular “Muhteşem Yüzyıl” (The Magnificent Century), are fictionalized accounts of the lives of sultans rather than historically accurate documentaries, according to academics.

“Turkish people confuse the idea of TV series and documentary. A TV series is a different thing than a documentary,” said Erhan Afyoncu, a professor on the board of the Atatürk High Institute of Culture, Language and History, as well as a former consultant for “The Magnificent Century.”

Fictional side

Some have issued criticisms of historical series, Afyoncu said during a recent symposium in the northern province of Tokat, but added that it was difficult to produce such series.

“Historic TV series have a reality side as well as a fictional side,” the former consultant said. “The fictional side needs much more work. You have to create a fiction. You know the political events from history and you stick to this reality when making a TV series. But no one knows how a sultan approached his wife or how he behaved in daily life. This is why you have to fictionalize it. We did it in ‘Magnificent Century.’ There were discussions about sending Süleyman the Magnificent on journeys in the TV series. But I added these journey scenes to the series. But it is interesting that the series had lower ratings in these episodes.”

Afyoncu said state-owned television channel Turkish Radio and Television (TRT) had made historic TV series but that they had not attracted much public interest.

“TRT made TV series without women and their intrigues. People criticize other TV series but do not watch these ones. This is what I don’t understand,” Afyoncu said.

Secrecy of privacy

Fictionalization is occasionally necessary when there is a dearth of historical documents, said Professor Ali Açıkel, another symposium participant and a historian at Gaziosmanpaşa University, but added that these dramatizations should not contradict historical facts, general customs, traditions and law.

Scenarios set in historical times should not be infused with the perceptions of the present, Açıkel said, adding that ethical values should also be reflected in perceptions.

“The secrecy of private life should be respected. Otherwise, it is disrespectful to the private life of the Ottoman sultans. TV series are based on fiction when documents and information is insufficient. Documentaries aim to inform people according to a chronological order. There is no fiction in documentaries but some parts of TV series are fictional.”

Source : Hürriyet Daily News

 

« Turkish ‘TV series spring’ continues » – Hürriyet Daily News

The TV series such as Dila Hanım, are expected to attract lots of viewers both natoanally and internationally. The series which are recently started feature famous actors and actresses from Turkish televisions.

Article by Aslı Öymen

« The recent developments in the Turkey’s TV series sector reveal the increase in the audience. Each new production sold to foreign countries. Cannes’ MIPCOM fair unveils the latest situation […]

Turks are everywhere

As a Turkish person, I must admit that the first thing that attracted my attention and made me feel proud were the huge billboards and banners of various Turkish T.V. series that I encountered in the fair area, on the streets, and in cafes. The English translations of our T.V. series’ attracted me the most in those banners: Time Goes by (Öyle Bir Geçer Zaman ki), Magnificent Century (Muhteşem Yüzyıl), Fatmagül (Fatmagül’ün Suçu ne?), Fallen Angel (Kötü Yol), My Partner Knows (Ben Bilmem Eşim Bilir).

However, Kuzey Güney, literally meaning North and South, was not translated and was instead left as it is in Turkish.

Until a few years ago, no Turkish television station stands could be found at MIP apart from the official Turkish Radio and Television (TRT), let alone billboards and banners. Things have changed in a very short time. This year there were five Turkish T.V. channels with stands in the fair: TRT, Kanal D, Show T.V., Star, and ATV. Along with those, various independent production and distribution companies were represented. While the distributors were actively pushing sales during the daytime, they organized cool parties at nights, which were very popular.

‘Turkish series spring’

With its first attempt to expanding abroad coming with “Gümüş” in 2007, Turkish T.V. series first invaded the screens of the Arab world. Today, about 150 Turkish series’ are being exported to 73 countries across Asia, Europe and Africa. Sales of these are estimated to reach 100 million dollars annually, from just 1 million dollars in 2007.

After last week’s MIPCOM journey, Turks are sure to expand their sphere of influence even more. This year, our series also attracted the attention of the Far East, with demands coming from Korea and China. American company NBC Universal bought the format rights of “Aşk-ı Memnu” in order to distribute it to Latin America, which was once the most prominent series exporter.

We also set one of the best examples of format rights and adaptation with “Umutsuz Ev Kadınları,” Kanal D’s adaptation of internationally-known American series Desperate Housewives. This was a successful adaptation that corresponded to the taste of Turkish audience.

Currently, Turkish series are being sold abroad for amounts between 5,000 and 125,000 dollars per episode. This means that “an expensive series” with 100 episodes costs 12.5 million dollars for a foreign broadcaster. On the other hand, format prices are considerably low. The format price for one episode is generally between 5,000 and 10,000 dollars. »

Best thing that has happened to series

One of the lectures in MIPCOM was on Turkish T.V. series, titled “Turkish drama: the new delight.”

Kanal D’s editor-in-chief Pelin Diztaş, Global Agency’s CEO İzzet Pinto, the head of Ay Production Kerem Çatay, United Arab Emirates-based GM Productions’ head Fadi İsmail, and Lebanon K Partners’ distributor Nabil Kazan all attended the lecture.

During the lecture, the subject of the price of Turkish series’ came up, and İsmail and Kazan complained about the increasing prices. During his speech, Fadi İsmail said: “Turkish series’ are the best thing that has happened to Arab series,’ and the Arabs will learn to make their own series soon.” He warned that this would endanger the future of Turkish T.V. series’ in Arab countries, but this was not accepted by other attendants. Pelin Diztaş argued that making series’ could be learned, but finding and writing a plot was the most difficult part. “This is very abundant in our geography. Turkey is a country with abundant traumatic material, with a rich geography and a significant emotional dimension,” she said. As can be seen in the Desperate Housewives example, those learning to make T.V. series will shoot their own series with plots they have bought. I don’t know how long the learning process will last for, but when the localization trend is used it will become unavoidable for series to be framed in a certain format.

Source : Hürriyet Daily News

« Incest: The last taboo in Turkish cinema and TV » – Hürriyet Daily News

The movie, ‘When Derin Falls,’ is about a 8 -year-old girl, who tries connecting with her father in every possbile way, including encounters with sexual undertones. Source : Hürriyet

« The recent controversy around a Turkish film dealing with incest reminded many of a similar brouhaha over another film on incest two years ago, as well as Deputy Prime Minister Bülent Arınç’s warning to TV producers to keep incest away from screens

Red flags were raised amid media delirium last week when the head of the jury for a national film festival openly condemned a movie on moral grounds, allegedly threatening to ban the movie from entering the national competition.

The festival was the Golden Orange Film Festival, the biggest one in Turkey. The head of the jury was the ever-controversial Hülya Avşar, who had made headlines in the summer when a member of the jury resigned in protest over her selection, questioning her judgment and knowledge of film.

The film, which became the most talked-about film of the festival, was director Çağatay Tosun’s sophomore feature “Derin Düşün-ce” (a word play that could mean “Deep Thought” or “When Derin Falls,” referring to the little protagonist’s name). And the controversial subject matter was incest, a no-go area in Turkish cinema, television, literature and pop culture. […]

Incest is indeed a taboo that is ignored and remains invisible in the media, in cinema and on TV. And if there is a hint of incest, censorship comes in all forms and from all places. Sometimes it’s the audience, sometimes the head of the jury, and at other times, it’s the deputy prime minister.

Last spring, Deputy Prime Minister Bülent Arınç made a statement out of the blue in an attempt to put into action his conservative views on relationships (and probably the views of his fellow members of the pro-Islamic ruling Justice and Development Party – AKP) as depicted in dozens of TV series.

“Some of the marginal themes seen in recent TV series, such as relationships between people of the opposite sex and incest, have become cause for serious criticism, upsetting society. We have to take seriously the criticisms regarding these series. These themes have to be reassessed,” said Arınç, stealing headlines for a few days if not actually making much of an impact on the plots in the series.

It was not that difficult to trace the inappropriate relationships between the sexes he was referring to, as infidelity, marital rape and abusive relationships are not new to recent TV series in Turkey. But incest? The closest reference Arınç could have in mind was the series “Eve Düşen Yıldırım” (Lightning Strikes Home), which features two cousins falling in love; it’s not an unusual situation, and one that is definitely not found immoral in most parts of Turkey. The story, on the other hand, was not an original one written for TV. “Eve Düşen Yıldırım” was an adaptation of Turkish writer Nahid Sırrı Örik’s 1934 novel of the same name. In fact, it was not that uncommon to see cousins falling in love and marrying in the Turkish novels of the early 20th century, seen in such classics like Reşat Nuri Güntekin’s 1922 novel “Çalıkuşu” (The Wren) or “Aşk-ı Memnu” (Forbidden Love) by Halit Ziya Uşaklıgil, serialized in 1900. Of course, when the latter was adapted to TV to huge success in 2008. »

Source : Hürriyet Daily News

« Works continue to give TV series to foreigners for free  » – Hürriyet Daily News

« Following a decision taken by from the Culture and Tourism Ministry, Turkish T.V. series’ will start to be aired in a number of countries free of charge. Vice Culture and Tourism Minister Abdurrahman Arıcı has announced that Turkish series’ will be aired abroad with the support of the ministry, in the interest of promoting Turkey in foreign countries.

“With T.V. series’ we can enter every house and spread the influence of Turkish culture,” he said, adding that tourists coming from Middle Eastern countries often visited the venues where T.V. shows were shot.

Turkey has signed deals with seven companies that market T.V. series, films and documentaries to the world, Arıcı said, speaking at the October meeting of the Skal Antalya Club.

According to an article in daily Radikal, while Turkey’s T.V. exports currently amount to a total of $60 million, and the aim is to increase this amount to $100 million. “Magnificent Century” (Muhteşem Yüzyıl) is among the most popular, and the ministry would particularly like to air this series in Kyrgyzstan, said Arıcı.

The importance of industry

At the same meeting, Istanbul Chamber of Commerce board member İsrafil Kuralay said the industry had reached a very important position.

The Daily News has previously reported that Greek audiences in particular have learned a number of Turkish words thanks to the series that are aired in their country. Turkish series such as “Magnificent Century,” “Sıla,” “Asi,” “Acı Hayat” (Bitter Life), “Deniz Yıldızı” (Starfish) and “Lale Devri” (Tulip Age) are among those being shown in Greece, and Greek people have thus started to pick up simple words and phrases in Turkish such as “Hello,” “How are you?” and “My dear.”

“Magnificent Century” is being aired in Greece on OBN, one of the most watched stations in the country, under the title “Süleyman Velicanstveni” (Süleyman the Magnificent). It was also the highest rated T.V. series in Bosnia Herzegovina on its first day of broadcast. »

Source : Hürriyet Daily News

« Greeks tune in to Turkish soap opera, despite critics views » – SES Türkiye

Article by Andy Dabilis and Erisa Dautaj for SES Türkiye in Athens and Istanbul

« Greek nationalists view the series as being a Turkish invasion of sorts, while others see opportunities for beneficial cultural exchange.

Greeks have been enthralled by Turkish TV series « The Magnificent Century » in recent months. The series is comprised of historical recreations of 16th-century Sultan Suleiman’s life and slick soap opera-like tales of intrigue and family drama, prompting alarmed nationalists to issue warnings that fans should stop watching.

Greek viewers said they love the vicarious thrill of seeing how rich Turks live, and the shows make Istanbul seem an irresistible place to visit, while others relate to the problems of ordinary Turks.[…]

The series has become so popular that nationalist Thessaloniki Bishop Anthimos and the neo-Nazi Golden Dawn party have both condemned the show and urged Greeks not to watch.[…]

The Turkish shows’ prevalence is also a matter of economics as Greek television stations find it less expensive to buy them than to produce their own.[…]

Other Turkish shows such as « Ezel, » « Ask ve Ceza » and « Ask-I Memnu » show panoramic shots of Istanbul, alluring to potential visitors.[…] »

Source : SES Turkiye