Reports : TESEV

SOME QUOTES FROM SEVERAL TESEV REPORTS :

Media Content: The Regulatory Framework and Court Decisions (p.35)

« Article 25 of the constitution guarantees freedom of expression and protects individuals from state interference on expression of their opinions. Article 28 protects freedom of the press and imposes on the state a positive obligation to undertake the requisite measures to ensure the exercise of this freedom. The constitution guarantees the right to declare or disseminate opinions individually or collectively and to access and share information and opinions without state interference.

What lies beyond this liberal façade, however, is a framework where nationalism, statism and cultural conservatism emerge as the supreme values looming over individual rights. The exercise of fundamental freedoms is subject to compliance with; inter alia, national security, national unity and state secrets.

The constitution entrusts the state with the duty to make sure that citizens act and think in accordance with the ideals of Atatürk, the values of the nation and the morals of the family. Article 41 identifies the family as the ‘foundation of the Turkish society’ and tasks the state with taking measures to protect ‘the peace and welfare of the family’ and to protect children against all kinds of abuse and violence. Article 58 allots the

duty to protect the youth against abuse, exploitation and ‘bad habits’ such as alcoholism, drugs and gambling to the state, and as well as the responsibility to raise young people in accordance ‘the principles and revolutions of Atatürk.’ Making note of this ‘state- centrist approach,’ the Council of Europe (CoE) Commissioner for Human Rights pointed out the pervasive recognition ‘that the letter and spirit of the present Turkish Constitution represent a major obstacle to the effective protection of pluralism and freedom of expression’ (Hammarberg, 2011: para. 11). » […]

Executive Summary

Media policy in Turkey has shaped the media-state relationship since the establishment of the first newspaper in the late Ottoman period. While regulations were often employed as an effective disciplinary tool against the press in processes of state formation and modernization, opponent journalists have constantly been suppressed by state and non-state actors who claimed to act in the name of ‘state interests’.

The coup d’état in 1980 and the concomitant economic liberalisation changed the ownership structure of the media sector with the entry of new investors. Following the abolishment of state monopoly on broadcasting in the 1990s, big conglomerates expanding through vertical and horizontal mergers have dominated all fields of the media. The high concentrated market structure in the media was made possible due to the inadequacy of legal barriers to cross- mergers, as well as the lack of measures that would prevent media conglomerates from participating in public tenders in other sectors of the economy. The shortcomings of the regulatory framework to promote press freedom and diversity in the media has encouraged big corporations to regard themselves as legitimate political actors that can bargain with the government.

Media ownership was restructured following the economic crisis in 2001. Big media groups, which had investments in the financial and banking sectors, were particularly affected by the crisis; some being completely wiped out of the market, while others were seized by the state. Shortly after the Justice and Development Party (Adalet ve Kalkınma Partisi- AK Parti) came to power in 2002, the mainstream media was reconfigured ideologically as either ‘opponent’ or ‘proponent’ to the government.

Notwithstanding the limited positive effects of the EU accession process on media freedom, there are dozens of ECtHR judgments regarding freedom of expression and freedom of the press waiting to be executed by the Turkish state. Journalists who are powerless vis-à-vis the owners and political power are particularly affected by the political polarisation in the media. The structural obstacles to unionization and the lack of solidarity in the profession lead to labour exploitation, low quality content and violations of media ethics.

The lack of a strong pro-democracy social movement; the ideological conservatism of the judiciary; the institutional weakness of the parliament; and the lack of democracy within political parties render the government – and future governments – too powerful vis-à-vis the society and the media. On a positive note, however, there is a growing awareness on the need for social monitoring of the media. In the absence of a widely accepted and established self- regulatory framework, various non-governmental organizations and activist groups started to watch the media in order to expand the culture of diversity and to reduce discrimination, racism and hate speech.

Culture: (p.15-16)

« In recent years, Turkey has not just become more politically and economically active in the Middle East but culturally as well. The popularity of Turkish television series and holidaying in Turkey has become far more apparent. Thus the 2010 survey included questions about television and holidaying to understand this phenomenon.

Turkey as a destination has become more popular. Between 2007 and 2009, the number of tourists arriving from the surveyed countries increased from between 25% to 55% depending on the country.

Since 2009, Turkey has lifted visa requirements with Jordan, Lebanon, and Syria in both directions as well as for Saudi Arabian citizens. Indeed, comparing the number of tourists arriving from these four countries in the month of July 2010 to July 2009 reveals the impact of this policy: there was a 32% increase in the number of tourists from Jordan, an 88% increase from Lebanon, a 133% increase from Syria and a 59% increase from Saudi Arabia.

The results show that respondents saw Turkey as the most popular Middle Eastern destination. Indeed, Turkey was the most popular destination in Lebanon (51%), Iran (50%), Syria (43%), Jordan (41%), Palestine (41%) and Saudi Arabia (26%). Turkey’s nearest rival, Saudi Arabia, was the most popular destination amongst Egyptians only (32%). When asked about holidaying outside the region, France was the most popular destination but Turkey was the second most popular alongside Germany with 9%.

Turkish television series, dubbed in Arabic, are contributing to the visibililty of the country in the Middle East. Today the volume of these exports to the region is around $50 million per annum.

Indeed, television series have become an important part of Turkey’s soft power; the number of people who watch Turkish TV series in the region is very substantial and this has the potential to have a lasting effect on Turkey’s image. The survey results confirm this popularity: 78% of respondents had watched a Turkish TV series. The number of viewers was particularly high in Syria (85%) and Iraq (89%). Indeed, it’s not just the series themselves but Turkish celebrities that are popular in the Middle East: respondents could name no fewer than 15 Turkish TV series and 15 celebrities. Knowledge of Turkey’s television series and celebrities was particularly noteworthy in Iraq. »

 Television Broadcasting: (p.51-52)

« According to data from the Radio Television Supreme Council, there are currently 24 national, 15 regional and 209 local television enterprises on air. The categorization as national, regional and local broadcasting was done in consideration of RTÜK’s terrestrial broadcasting frequencies plan and the licenses granted under said plan. Yet, the developing technology and the widespread usage of satellite receiver systems continue to blur the distinction between local, regional and national broadcasting. For example, a television enterprise established in and broadcasting from the Black Sea region can have its broadcasts reach the national and even international audiences through satellite. Hence, although it may have a local broadcasting licence, it is not possible to regard such a television station as a local broadcaster. Even this change only demonstrates the need for more research and more discussion on the area of local broadcasting in Turkey.

On the other hand, in all of these scales, television is the media channel that has the highest access rate: it reaches more than 98% of those living in Turkey.The daily average spent watching television is 3 hours, going up to 7 hours for stay at housewifes. Cable TV broadcasting services are available in 21 cities, with approximately 1 million 275 thousand subscribers. Türksat A.Ş, the cable company that broadcasts public and private television enterprises, belongs to the state and is a monopoly. The company provides both infrastructure and broadcasting services; hence it also determines the channels that can broadcast on cable. A new draft regulation on the privatization of this service has been submitted to the public by RTÜK. The effective date of the regulation is as yet unknown.

Additionally, there are also two digital broadcasting platforms in the television broadcasting sector, one belonging to the Çukurova Group (Digiturk), and the other to the Doğan Group (D-Smart). DIGITURK has approximately 2 million 200 thousand subscribers, while D-Smart has 1 million 200 thousand subscribers. »

 Print & broadcast medias : (p.30-31)

« The media sector in Turkey is divided into aggregations. The biggest eight of the 15 media groups are Albayrak, Doğan, Çukurova,Ciner, Çalık, Feza, Doğuş and İhlas Groups. All major private television and radio stations, newspapers and periodicals belong to these groups. The Doğan Media Group and Merkez Group also have a monopoly over the distribution of the print media through Yay-Sat and MDP, respectively.

Established in 1980, Doğan Media Group is the largest media holding company in Turkey. The group has eight dailies: Hürriyet, Milliyet, Radikal, Posta, Vatan, Fanatik, Referans and Hürriyet Daily News. Hürriyet and Milliyet have a nationalist and statist position while Radikal has a social-democrat point of view. Posta is a tabloid newspaper and Referans was a financial newspaper that has recently been merged with Radikal. Doğan Media Group also owns the national TV channels Kanal D, Star and CNN Turk and radio channels Radio D, Slow Turk Radio and Radio Moda. The group also owns a digital platform called D-Smart, which includes many thematic and pay-per-view channels. Moreover, the group provides access for all TV channels on Türksat satellite. It has a stake in the cinema and advertising industries through D Productions. Channel Romania D is another investment of the group in Romania. The group also includes Doğan Burda Rizzoli (DBR), a joint venture with the German publishing house Burda and the Italian media corporation Rizzoli. Doğan runs its own news agency, DHA, publishing house, Doğan Kitap, and merchandising company, D&R. […]

Doğuş Media Group was founded in 1999. Its first channel was the news channel, NTV. In addition, the group collaborates with international brands such as CNBC, NBA, Billboard, Virgin, and National Geographic.

The Albayrak Group was established in 1952. Until 1982, it was active only in the construction sector. The group began publishing the daily Yeni Şafak in 1995. Having liberal and left-wing columnists who do not belong to the Islamic community the paper has emerged from, Yeni Şafak “offers a relatively broader perspective especially about the controversial issues.” Since 2007 it has been running TVNET, a news channel.

Ciner Holding was an active company in the automotive and energy sectors under the name of Park Holding. In 2002, the company entered the media sector. In September 2007 Ciner Publishing Holding was founded; it currently owns Habertürk.com, Habertürk Radyo, Habertürk TV, Ajans Habertürk and Gazete Habertürk. The company holds international TV and radio channels such as Bloomberg TV and Bloomberg HT Radyo. The Turkish language editions of Marie Claire and Maison, belong to Ciner Group as does the recently closed Newsweek, FHM, Food and Travel, GEO, and Mother and Baby.

Çukurova Holding currently publishes the Akşam, Güneş, Tercüman newspapers and Alem magazine and owns the Show and Sky Turk TV stations. Turkcell, the leader in the GSM industry, as well as Digiturk, which broadcasts the national football league matches, also belong to this group.

The Turkuvaz Group belongs to Çalık Holding. In December 2007 the group bought the Merkez Medya Group from Ciner Holding and became the proprietors of the newspapers Yeni Asır (Izmir), Sabah, Takvim, Günaydın and Pas Fotomac, the weeklies Bebeğim ve Biz, Sinema, Home Art, Yeni Aktuel and Gobal Enerji, as well as the television station ATV. […] »

« Turkey’s Image in the Arab World »written by Carnegie Middle East Center Director Paul Salem draws upon the survey to look at how Turkey is and should be responding to recent events in the region.

(p.6-7)
« […]Questions 20 and 21 indicate the influence of soft power. A full 78% of respondents in the Arab world and Iran report that they have watched Turkish soap operas. Indeed these TV programs have taken the region by storm, with Turkish TV stars becoming pop idols among young and old, men and women. The impact of watching hours of these Turkish soap operas cannot be underestimated as they have the effect of creating attachment, understanding, and affection for Turkish identity, culture, and values among wide regional publics. Like Egyptian TV and cinema created a prominent cultural place for Egypt in previous decades, Turkish television has made similar inroads in Arab (and Iranian) popular culture. This has been complemented by a wave of tourism to Turkey in which Arabs and Iranians from various classes and walks of life have visited Turkey and become familiar and attached to its towns and cities, history and monuments, culture and people. Turkey is identified in the survey as the most popular tourist destination (35% put it as their first choice; followed by 19% for Saudi Arabia; and 13% for Lebanon.)[…] »

« Challenges to Turkey’s Soft Power in the Middle East »written by the Dean of Graduate School of Sciences in METU Meliha Benli Altunışık questions how Turkey exercises its soft power in the Middle East, an issue that has become all the more relevant as a result of the Arab Spring.

Turkey’s attractiveness : (p.2)
 » […] Finally, in recent years Turkey has become a source of attraction because of its cultural products. Since 2004 Turkish TV series have become quite popular in the Arab world. 78 percent of the respondents said yes to the question of whether they have ever watched a Turkish TV series in the TESEV poll. The popularity of these series has led to an increase in the numbers of visitors to Turkey from the Arab countries. The increase in human-tohuman interaction has facilitated learning from each other and started to shape images of the “other” in more positive ways.[…] »

 

« Interest in Turkish series boosts enthusiasm for Turkish novels » – Hürriyet Daily News

« Turkey might be a society that watches far more than it reads, but the popularity of certain TV shows has nonetheless increased interest in books, Federation of Professional Publishers Associations (YAYFED) Chairman Bayram Murat has said.

“When some of the Turkish series break ratings records, the novels that inspired the scenarios of the series also break sales records,” he said during a press conference organized by the Antalya Journalists Association to discuss the TÜYAP Antalya Book Fair, which will be organized from Feb. 13 to 17. » […]

Speaking previously about the links between Turkish soap operas and the country’s literature, Nilüfer Narlı, a sociologist at Bahçeşehir University, said Turkey had increased its “soft power” in the Middle East and Balkan countries through such shows, the Hürriyet Daily News reported.

“As the circulation of soap operas in the international arena has increased, learning Turkish language and culture have become very important in the Arab and Balkan countries. This is what we call ‘soft power’ within the context of the culture industry,” she said.

Source : Hürriyet Daily News

« Turkish dramas receive tourism awards » – Hürriyet Daily News

Culture and Tourism Minister Ertuğrul Günay pose with the producers and actors of some popular Turkish TV dramas at the ceremony. AA photo. Source : Hürriyet

« Producers and actors of Turkey’s popular TV dramas were presented with plaques at a ceremony due to their great contributions to Turish tourism

The producers and actors of Turkish TV dramas, which receive international acclaim and are important in encouraging tourism in the country, were presented plaques recognizing their contributions to Turkey’s promotion at a ceremony held by the Tourist Hotel and Investors Association (TUROB).

In a speech during the ceremony, Culture Minister Ertuğrul Günay, praised those in the sectors of tourism and culture for objectively highlighting the beauty, richness and even the problems of the country to the world. He noted that in 2011 Turkey hosted the sixth-highest number of tourists holding foreign passports, surpassing Britain.

“In 2012, despite problems at our southern borders, we hosted some 32 million foreign tourists. Turkey gets nearly $25 billion in income from tourism. All people in the sector try to promote the country to the world but the most effective promotion is that of culture and arts. As a result of these efforts, the Turkish Culture and Tourism Ministry was chosen as the best tourism organization in Europe last year in Portugal. This is the result of our synergy.”

Günay said the ministry has aimed to support Turkish cinema in recent years, adding that they are preparing to develop a new cinema law. “TV dramas promote Turkey around the world on their own accord. I learned the names of many dramas and their actors while abroad over the years. I heard their names abroad for the first time and wondered about them. Many of my friends abroad joke that they organize their meetings and travels according to our TV dramas. They ask me ‘Is Turkey really so beautiful?’,” he said.

While the state had spent about 5 million Turkish Liras on cinema between 1990 and 2005, he said they have stepped up support to cinema since 2006 as in light of its prominence and influence.

“We have given some 110 million liras of support since 2006. We are working on a new cinema law. I will present it to the Council of Ministers in the coming meetings. We are trying to secure the rights of TV series actors. Once this law is made, we will have a more civilized cinema law.” […]

Popularity of Turkish dramas abroad

TUROB Chairman Timur Bayındır said that Turkish TV dramas are world-class quality and they are proud to see Turkish dramas aired on prime time abroad. “These dramas promote Turkey to millions of foreigners.”

Turkish actor Halit Ergenç, an actor in one of the most popular Turkish TV drama abroad, “Muhteşem Yüzyıl” (The Magnificent Century) as the Ottoman sultan Süleyman the Magnificent, spoke of the criticisms the drama has received. “If a project is good, it can face such attacks.”

He said the popularity of Turkish TV dramas, particularly in the Middle East, was a source of pride. “We did not estimate that our international success would reach this point. Neighboring countries are closely following us. It is very pleasant that Arabs watch us, too.”

Following the speeches, the actors and producers of TV dramas including “Muhteşem Yüzyıl,” “Kurtlar Vadisi” (Valley of the Wolves), “Ezel,” “Suskunlar” (The Silent), “Binbir Gece” (A Thousand and One Nights), “Öyle Bir Geçer Zaman ki” (Time Goes By) and “Yalan Dünya” (World of Lies), received their plaques.

Source : Hürriyet

«  »Muhteşem Süleyman » Hırvatistan’da Gotovina’yı geçti  » – Radikal

Source : Radikal

« Türk dizilerinin en çok izlendiği ülkelerden biri olan Hırvatistan’da yeni yıl dolayısıyla düzenlenen hediyelik eşya fuarında, Muhteşem Yüzyıl dizisi hediyelikleri yerel yıldızlarınkinden çok sattı.

ZAGREB – Fuarda Türk sanatçıların fotoğraflarının bulunduğu eşyaların satılması medyada eleştirilirken, dizide Kanuni Sultan Süleyman’ı canlandıran sanatçının resminin yer aldığı bardağın, Hollanda ‘nın Lahey kentinde eski Yugoslavya için kurulan Uluslararası Ceza Mahkemesi tarafından serbest bırakılan ve son günlerde ülkedeki en popüler kişi olan eski general Ante Gotovina’nınkinden daha çok satılması dikkati çekti.

Hırvatistan’ın başkenti Zagreb’de, 6-19 Aralık tarihleri arasında kutlanan « Aziz Nikola » da denilen « Noel Bayramı » ve yaklaşan yeni yıl dolayısıyla hediyelik eşya fuarı düzenlendi.

Her yıl organize edilen fuara, çocuklara hediyelerin verildiği Aziz Nikola Günü’nde bu yıl da ilgi yoğundu. Zagreb’de yaşayanlar çocuklarına hediye almak için fuara büyük ilgi gösterirken, Türk dizilerinin çok izlendiği ülkelerden biri olan Hırvatistan’daki hediyelik eşya fuarına bu yıl, Türkiye ‘de yayımlanan ve bölgede de takip edilen Muhteşem Yüzyıl dizisi hediyelikleri damgasını vurdu.

Hırvat medyasında, fuarda Türk sanatçıların fotoğraflarının bulunduğu eşyaların satılmasına ilişkin bazı eleştiriler yer alırken, « geleneksel fuarın artık bit pazarına döndüğü » şeklinde değerlendirmeler de yapıldı.

« HOLLYWOOD YILDIZLARINA GÖRE ‘SULYO’ ÇOK DAHA İYİ BİR KARAKTER »

AA muhabirinin konuya ilişkin düşüncelerini sorduğu « Advent Fuarı »nda stant açan bazı satıcılar, medyadaki eleştirilere tepki gösterdi.

Fuarda hediyelik eşya standı açan ve ismini vermek istemeyen bir satıcı, gazetecilere tepki göstererek, « Bizi rahat bırakın, ekmeğimizi kazanalım. Çocuklarımızın karnını doyurmamız lazım. Sultan Süleyman ve Muhteşem Yüzyıl hediyelik eşyalarını satmamızda bir sorun yok. Bu fuar kilisenin organize ettiği bir fuar değil. Hollywood yıldızlarının resimleriyle hediyelikler sattığımız zaman sorun yok, Sultan Süleyman olunca sıkıntı. Hollywood yıldızlarına göre ‘Sulyo’ (Süleyman) çok daha iyi bir karakter » diye konuştu.

Hırvatistan menşeli olmayan ürün satmakla suçlandıklarını da belirten satıcılar ise kısa süre önce Lahey’deki mahkeme tarafından serbest bırakılan eski general Ante Gotovina ve « Sultan Süleyman » resimli bardaklarının Hırvatistan malı olduğunu söyledi. » […]

Source : Radikal

« Turkey ranks 20th in Monocle’s Soft Power Survey  » – Today’s Zaman

« Continuing its steady rise, Turkey for the first time has broken into the top 20 of Monocle magazine’s annual Soft Power Survey rankings.

According to Monocle, Turkey made the top 20 thanks to the popularity of its soap operas across Europe and the Middle East and the bold new routes added by Turkish Airlines.

Coined by a Harvard academic in 1990, the term “soft power” describes how states use attraction and persuasion, rather than coercion or payment, to change behavior.

Monocle magazine’s annual « Global Soft Power » survey ranks nations according to their politics, diplomatic infrastructure, cultural output, capacity for education and appeal to business rather than their financial and military power. » […]

Source : Today’s Zaman

« 100 million dollars brought in from sending turkish shows abroad » – Sabah

« The exporting of Turkish television series to the Middle East and Eastern Europe, which have resulted in the soaring popularity Turkish brands, continues at full-force. Bringing in 100 million dollars in exports this year alone, television shows from Turkey are now selling at higher prices than famous U.S. television series.

According to Customs and Trade Minister Hayati Yazıcı, the peaked interest in Turkish television shows abroad has resulted in turning all eyes on this fast growing sector in Turkey. According to Minister Yazıcı, while statistics show that throughout the globe audio-visual exports saw a 4.54 percent growth on average, in Turkey this year the same figure came to 25.98 percent. Turkish shows are taking the monopoly of prime time spots in a wide variety of locations throughout the Balkans, the Middle East and Central Asia.

Turkey’s entertainment sector has been exporting for five years now. Up until just two years ago, Turkey’s entrance in the market was based on a low-price policy, however now some of the nation’s most popular productions are selling for higher than popular U.S. shows such as Mad Men.

İzzet Pinto, CEO of Global Agency is one of the most prominent businessmen selling Turkish television shows all over the world. According to Pinto, Turkey’s popular sprung to life with television shows such as Bir İstanbul Masalı (An Istanbul Tale), 1001 Gece (1,001 Nights) and Gümüş (Silver). « Today, 100 television stations are being exported to 60 countries. This sector results in bringing in 100 million dollars in foreign currency, » states Pinto.

While Turkish shows are already topping the popularity charts in Middle Eastern and Balkan nations, Turkey now intends to dominate the Western European market. İzzet Pinto explains that they are currently launching in France and if they see success they will go ahead and enter nations such as Italy and Spain.

Western interest in Turkish show

The wind of Turkish shows, which undoubtedly blows strongest in the Gulf nations, has now made its way to the Western European segment, which symbolizes strong economy and high social life standards. For the first time ever, a Turkish television show will soon be released on a Swedish state-run television station.

Considered to be Sweden’s version of Turkey’s TRT, Sveriges Television (STV) will soon be broadcasting the popular television series « Son » (The End) which runs on Atv and stars Yiğit Özşener, Nehir Erdoğan and Berrak Tüzünataç. »

Source : Sabah

 

« TV series criticized by Turkish PM has 150 million viewers, culture ministry says » – Hürriyet

« Turkey’s Culture and Tourism Ministry has responded to the prime minister’s recent suggestion that “Muhteşem Yüzyıl” (The Magnificent Century) was misrepresenting Ottoman history, emphasizing the show’s number large viewership, as well as the general economic benefits of Turkish TV series.

« At the end of 2010 we had $65 mln in export revenue thanks to these T.V. series, » the head of the Intellectual Property Rights Property Rights department of the ministry, Abdullah Çelik, said in a speech at the Trakya University Balkans Congress Center.

« We exported 10,500 hours of T.V. series’ in 2011, however we had no export revenue in 2006, » he said, adding that such series reached 150 million people in 76 countries around the world.

Prime Minister Recep Tayyip Erdoğan dished out heavy criticism on the hit Turkish TV series, “Muhteşem Yüzyıl,” (The Magnificent Century) for its portrayal of the Ottoman ruler Süleyman on Nov. 25. « […]

Source : Hürriyet

« Turkish ‘TV series spring’ continues » – Hürriyet Daily News

The TV series such as Dila Hanım, are expected to attract lots of viewers both natoanally and internationally. The series which are recently started feature famous actors and actresses from Turkish televisions.

Article by Aslı Öymen

« The recent developments in the Turkey’s TV series sector reveal the increase in the audience. Each new production sold to foreign countries. Cannes’ MIPCOM fair unveils the latest situation […]

Turks are everywhere

As a Turkish person, I must admit that the first thing that attracted my attention and made me feel proud were the huge billboards and banners of various Turkish T.V. series that I encountered in the fair area, on the streets, and in cafes. The English translations of our T.V. series’ attracted me the most in those banners: Time Goes by (Öyle Bir Geçer Zaman ki), Magnificent Century (Muhteşem Yüzyıl), Fatmagül (Fatmagül’ün Suçu ne?), Fallen Angel (Kötü Yol), My Partner Knows (Ben Bilmem Eşim Bilir).

However, Kuzey Güney, literally meaning North and South, was not translated and was instead left as it is in Turkish.

Until a few years ago, no Turkish television station stands could be found at MIP apart from the official Turkish Radio and Television (TRT), let alone billboards and banners. Things have changed in a very short time. This year there were five Turkish T.V. channels with stands in the fair: TRT, Kanal D, Show T.V., Star, and ATV. Along with those, various independent production and distribution companies were represented. While the distributors were actively pushing sales during the daytime, they organized cool parties at nights, which were very popular.

‘Turkish series spring’

With its first attempt to expanding abroad coming with “Gümüş” in 2007, Turkish T.V. series first invaded the screens of the Arab world. Today, about 150 Turkish series’ are being exported to 73 countries across Asia, Europe and Africa. Sales of these are estimated to reach 100 million dollars annually, from just 1 million dollars in 2007.

After last week’s MIPCOM journey, Turks are sure to expand their sphere of influence even more. This year, our series also attracted the attention of the Far East, with demands coming from Korea and China. American company NBC Universal bought the format rights of “Aşk-ı Memnu” in order to distribute it to Latin America, which was once the most prominent series exporter.

We also set one of the best examples of format rights and adaptation with “Umutsuz Ev Kadınları,” Kanal D’s adaptation of internationally-known American series Desperate Housewives. This was a successful adaptation that corresponded to the taste of Turkish audience.

Currently, Turkish series are being sold abroad for amounts between 5,000 and 125,000 dollars per episode. This means that “an expensive series” with 100 episodes costs 12.5 million dollars for a foreign broadcaster. On the other hand, format prices are considerably low. The format price for one episode is generally between 5,000 and 10,000 dollars. »

Best thing that has happened to series

One of the lectures in MIPCOM was on Turkish T.V. series, titled “Turkish drama: the new delight.”

Kanal D’s editor-in-chief Pelin Diztaş, Global Agency’s CEO İzzet Pinto, the head of Ay Production Kerem Çatay, United Arab Emirates-based GM Productions’ head Fadi İsmail, and Lebanon K Partners’ distributor Nabil Kazan all attended the lecture.

During the lecture, the subject of the price of Turkish series’ came up, and İsmail and Kazan complained about the increasing prices. During his speech, Fadi İsmail said: “Turkish series’ are the best thing that has happened to Arab series,’ and the Arabs will learn to make their own series soon.” He warned that this would endanger the future of Turkish T.V. series’ in Arab countries, but this was not accepted by other attendants. Pelin Diztaş argued that making series’ could be learned, but finding and writing a plot was the most difficult part. “This is very abundant in our geography. Turkey is a country with abundant traumatic material, with a rich geography and a significant emotional dimension,” she said. As can be seen in the Desperate Housewives example, those learning to make T.V. series will shoot their own series with plots they have bought. I don’t know how long the learning process will last for, but when the localization trend is used it will become unavoidable for series to be framed in a certain format.

Source : Hürriyet Daily News

« Works continue to give TV series to foreigners for free  » – Hürriyet Daily News

« Following a decision taken by from the Culture and Tourism Ministry, Turkish T.V. series’ will start to be aired in a number of countries free of charge. Vice Culture and Tourism Minister Abdurrahman Arıcı has announced that Turkish series’ will be aired abroad with the support of the ministry, in the interest of promoting Turkey in foreign countries.

“With T.V. series’ we can enter every house and spread the influence of Turkish culture,” he said, adding that tourists coming from Middle Eastern countries often visited the venues where T.V. shows were shot.

Turkey has signed deals with seven companies that market T.V. series, films and documentaries to the world, Arıcı said, speaking at the October meeting of the Skal Antalya Club.

According to an article in daily Radikal, while Turkey’s T.V. exports currently amount to a total of $60 million, and the aim is to increase this amount to $100 million. “Magnificent Century” (Muhteşem Yüzyıl) is among the most popular, and the ministry would particularly like to air this series in Kyrgyzstan, said Arıcı.

The importance of industry

At the same meeting, Istanbul Chamber of Commerce board member İsrafil Kuralay said the industry had reached a very important position.

The Daily News has previously reported that Greek audiences in particular have learned a number of Turkish words thanks to the series that are aired in their country. Turkish series such as “Magnificent Century,” “Sıla,” “Asi,” “Acı Hayat” (Bitter Life), “Deniz Yıldızı” (Starfish) and “Lale Devri” (Tulip Age) are among those being shown in Greece, and Greek people have thus started to pick up simple words and phrases in Turkish such as “Hello,” “How are you?” and “My dear.”

“Magnificent Century” is being aired in Greece on OBN, one of the most watched stations in the country, under the title “Süleyman Velicanstveni” (Süleyman the Magnificent). It was also the highest rated T.V. series in Bosnia Herzegovina on its first day of broadcast. »

Source : Hürriyet Daily News

« Greeks tune in to Turkish soap opera, despite critics views » – SES Türkiye

Article by Andy Dabilis and Erisa Dautaj for SES Türkiye in Athens and Istanbul

« Greek nationalists view the series as being a Turkish invasion of sorts, while others see opportunities for beneficial cultural exchange.

Greeks have been enthralled by Turkish TV series « The Magnificent Century » in recent months. The series is comprised of historical recreations of 16th-century Sultan Suleiman’s life and slick soap opera-like tales of intrigue and family drama, prompting alarmed nationalists to issue warnings that fans should stop watching.

Greek viewers said they love the vicarious thrill of seeing how rich Turks live, and the shows make Istanbul seem an irresistible place to visit, while others relate to the problems of ordinary Turks.[…]

The series has become so popular that nationalist Thessaloniki Bishop Anthimos and the neo-Nazi Golden Dawn party have both condemned the show and urged Greeks not to watch.[…]

The Turkish shows’ prevalence is also a matter of economics as Greek television stations find it less expensive to buy them than to produce their own.[…]

Other Turkish shows such as « Ezel, » « Ask ve Ceza » and « Ask-I Memnu » show panoramic shots of Istanbul, alluring to potential visitors.[…] »

Source : SES Turkiye

« Turkish television show fervor reaches western Europe » – Sabah

By Kerim Ülker.

« The recent wind of popularity for Turkish television series in the Middle East, which has increased the advertising market by 35 percent, has now reached Western Europe. Sweden, the symbol of welfare, will soon broadcasting a Turkish television series for the first time ever.

Turkish television series have found increasing popularity in a variety of nations spanning from Croatia to Azerbaijan, the UAE to Kosovo and even in some of Asia’s most distant nations such as Singapore and Vietnam.

The popularity of Turkish television series in the Middle East has also resulted in a significant increase in exports. Turkey, which every year sells 100 television shows to 20 different countries, is aiming to increase the 60 million dollars in exports to 100 million. With their increasing influence in the Arab world, the popularity of Turkish television shows is now beginning to reap results in the economy. Figures from the past 18 months, which include the Arab Spring, are showing that these shows are also making a mark on the advertising market.

THE END IN EUROPE FOR A FIRST

In 2010, there were 81 television shows broadcasted in the region. In 2011, this figure went up to 160. Turkish television series constitute a significant number of the shows running. Lebanese K&Partners TV Services CEO Nabil Kazan says that these Turkish shows played a significant role in the 35 percent increase in the advertising market this period, which reached 14.3 billion dollars.

The recent popularity of Turkish shows in countries such as Russia and Ukraine has now made its way to Western Europe nations. Sweden will soon be broadcasting a Turkish television for the first time ever. Sweden’s state-run Sveriges Television (STV) has signed on to broadcast the ATV show « The End » (Son), marking the first time a Turkish television series will run in Western Europe.

THE END TO SHOW IN SWEDEN

Sweden’s STV, which broadcasts from 16 different channels, holds a 36.3 percent share of ratings. STV, which is also set to host Eurovision 2013, will be releasing « The End » for Swedish viewers in January. Expressing how exciting he finds the show, STV Director Göran Danesten says, « This show is wonderful and will truly leave a unique impression. »

Source : Sabah

 

« Turkish drama ends up in Sweden » – C21 Media

« A Swedish channel has acquired Turkish drama series The End (25×90′) from prodco Ay Yapim and distributor Eccho Rights.

Pubcaster SVT plan to air the series on SVT2 in an access primetime slot in January 2013 as a daily half-hour version. The show originally aired earlier this year on ATV in Turkey.

“We are to be the first major broadcaster in Western Europe to air a series from the vibrant Turkish television drama scene. The End is a great and different addition to our drama slate,” said Göran Danasten, head of fiction at SVT.

The series tells the story of a man who disappears after a plane crash. Eccho Rights is the distribution arm of newly merged Sparks Networks of Sweden and Eccho Media of Benelux.

The SVT sale continues the boom in Turkish drama exports, which have seen series from the Eurasian territory airing across the Balkans, often ousting US imports from schedules there. »

Source : C21 Media

« Greeks learn Turkish by watching TV series » – Hürriyet Daily News

Greek television audiences especially enjoy ‘Magnificent Century.’ The famous series is broadcast in Greece under the title ‘The Magnificent Suleiman.’
. Source : Hürriyet

« Turkish television series that are broadcast in different countries are raising interest in Turkish language abroad. While Turkish TV series face many criticisms, they are also boosting interest in Turkish culture and language.

Greek audiences, in particular, have learned a number of Turkish words thanks to the series that are aired in their country. Turkish series such as “Muhteşem Yüzyıl” (Magnificent Century), “Sıla,” “Asi,” “Acı Hayat” (Bitter Life), “Deniz Yıldızı” (Starfish) and “Lale Devri” (Tulip Age) are among those shown in Greece, and Greek people have learned simple words in Turkish from them, such as “Hello,” “How are you?,” “My dear,” and also words like “Okay.”

Audience love Turkish actors

Greek television audiences especially enjoy “Magnificent Century.” The series is broadcast in Greece under the title “The Magnificent Suleiman.” Greek audiences love Turkish actors such as Kenan İmirzalıoğlu, Kıvanç Tatlıtuğ and Beren Saat. Greeks generally say that they do not see very many differences between themselves and Turkish people. They also say the Turkish TV series remind them of family life in their own society.

Greek people learn Turkish words from watching such TV series as “Magnificent Century,” “Asi” and “Sıla,” Kostantina Ilia, the owner of a small restaurant in Athens’ Sintagma Square, told Anatolia news agency.

“I do not know if I will be able to visit Turkey, but I would like to visit the country or take lessons to learn more Turkish words,” she said. “I think all of the actors in Turkish series are very talented,” she said, adding that İmirzalıoğlu is especially popular.

Golden Dawn party leader Nikos Mihaloliakos has some negative ideas about Turkish series, but all Greeks do not agree with his views, Ilia said.

“Turkish series depict strong family relationships,” said Klea Vakifli, working in a café that sells Turkish desserts. “Magnificent Century” and “Sıla” are the Turkish series most watched by Greek viewers, Vakifli said. »

Source : Hürriyet Daily News

« Balkan, MENA sales for Kanal D » – C21 Media

« Broadcasters in the Middle East and the Balkans have acquired Turkish drama Kuzey Guney from broadcaster Kanal D.

The soap, created and written by Ece Yörenç and Melek Gençoglu and produced by prodco Ay Yapim, has been acquired by UAE-based regional satcaster Dubai TV and RTV Pink in Serbia. An Iranian distributor has also bagged the show.

The 40×90′ series, which debuted in Turkey last September, follows two brothers who love the same woman. Dogan Media-owned Kanal D’s sales division describes the show as Turkey’s “most popular TV series of this year.”

Another Serbian channel, Prva TV, has also acquired drama Leaf Cast (174×90′), while a French distributor picked up Turkan for French-speaking markets. A distributor in Kazakhstan also bought drama series A Night in June.

The deals continue the recent upswing in demand for Turkish drama around Central and Eastern Europe and the Middle East. In the US, NBC recently acquired the format to Forbidden Love for its Hispanic channel Telemundo.

Kanal D has also unveiled its next big drama for the international market, Kotu Yol, which tells the story of a girl who runs away to be a movie star and find herself in the middle of a love triangle. It debut in Turkey last week. »

Source : C21 Media

Author : Ed Waller

« Turquie – Série TV : l’empire contre-attaque » – émission Faut Pas Rêver

Extrait d’un reportage de Sandrine Léonardelli et Patrick Méheut (production France Télévisions / Faut pas rêver)

« Depuis une dizaine d’années, les séries télé « made in Turquie » règnent en maîtres sur le petit écran. Avec un marché de 70 millions de téléspectateurs, leur production est devenue une véritable industrie dont Istanbul est la capitale. Exit les feuilletons brésiliens ou mexicains, les séries turques parlent aussi d’amour, de crimes ou de trahison. Leurs héros sont beaux, souvent riches et puissants et ils sont turcs ! Et c’est ça qui fait la différence ! Leader absolu de l’audience depuis un an, « Le siècle magnifique » raconte la vie de Soliman, le plus grand sultan de l’Empire ottoman, y compris sa vie privée… Un pari osé en Turquie ! « 

Lien sur le site officiel de l’émission Faut Pas Rêver : http://fautpasrever.france3.fr/?page=destination&destination=93&content=1