« Behzat Ç. bu kez KCK tutuklularını anlatacak: ‘Hodri meydan, isterseniz bunu yayınlamayın’  » – Sol

« Behzat Ç. » dizisi. Kaynak : Sol

« Behzat Ç.’nin yazarı Emrah Serbes, dizinin 80. bölümünde KCK tutuklularına değineceklerini belirterek, « Hodri meydan. İsterseniz bunu yayınlamayın » dedi.

Star TV’de yayınlanan “Behzat Ç.”nin yazarı Emrah Serbes, 80. bölümde KCK tutuklamalarını ele alacaklarını açıkladı.

“Memleketin Hali” adlı programa konuk olan Serbes, burada yaptığı açıklamada şu ifadeleri kullandı:

“Bize sürekli baskı yapıyorlar. Diziye başladığımızda saat 20.00’de yayınlanıyorduk. Ondan sonra 2’nci sezonda saat 22.00’ye attılar. Bu sezon da saat 23.00’e… Ayrıca ‘13+’ sınırı getirdiler. Ondan sonra sabah kuşağına doğru atacaklar. Bu gidişle Seda Sayan’dan önce yayınlanacağız. Ama bu halk her şeye rağmen izlenmez sanılan dizimizi izliyor.

Şimdi biz 80. bölümde KCK tutuklularına değiniyoruz, bunu yazıyoruz. İsterseniz bunu yayınlamayın. Hodri meydan, yayınlamayın. Ne yapacaksınız, bizi kaldıracak mısınız? Kaldıramazsınız. Seyircimize de söylüyorum, bize sahip çıkın. Eğer yayınlamazlarsa üstüne gidin diyorum.”

Source : Sol

« Comedy show satirizes TV series sector » – Hürriyet Daily News

Murat Cemcir (L) and Ahmet Kural (M) worked at the TV show ‘Ramazan Güzeldir, which is currently aired on TRT Arabic channel. In addition to trio’s currentl show on TRT called ‘İşler Güçler,’ Sadi Celil Cengiz (R) is acting a part at TRT’s ‘Leyla ile Mecnun,’ which is also broadcast on TRT Arabic as well.. Source : Hürriyet Daily News

By Tuba Parlak

« Comedy show ‘İşler Güçler’ sheds light on the TV industry, providing viewers with a peek at the reality behind the screen. The show is aired on Star TV every Thursday and has been an immediate success

Turkish TV series are widely appreciated at home and in neighboring countries, but audiences know little about the increasingly brutal nature of the TV show sector. A comedy series called “İşler Güçler,” however, is shedding light on the industry, providing viewers with a peek at the ugly reality behind the screen.

“We wanted to make a comedy out of what we or our friends have experienced in this sector and turn it into a satire of the whole TV show production system. It has worked very well so far,” said Selçuk Aydemir, the writer and director of the show, which became an immediate success after the airing of its first episode earlier in July on Star TV.

The lead characters, Ahmet Kural, Murat Cemcir and Sadi Celil Cengiz, perform in the show with their real names and their real career stories. “İşler Güçler” is aired on Star TV every Thursday, and the ratings have pleased the filmmakers. The general audience response, according to social media, has also been very positive, and it is more than likely that the show, which started as a summer series, will continue the next season.

“We are presenting a caricaturized version of our own career stories through which we are also making fun of ourselves, which is necessary for many reasons. First, if we told the audience what we have really gone through without any comical effects, they would not be able to watch the show without bursting out into hysterical tears,” said Kural, laughing before revealing the main reason, which was to sustain realism. “Had we started by criticizing the sector as fictional characters, it would have alienated the viewer in the long run because it would give them the false impression that we were out of this vicious circle. And unfortunately that is not true,” Kural said.

Dealing a death blow to Rambo

“İşler Güçler” takes its name from a colloquial phrase used to denote a hectic work schedule that is often not as busy as the speaker would have his listener believe. The title refers to the employment conditions in the sector, where the miscalculations of supply and demand might lead to the ruin of acting careers. An explosion in domestic and foreign demand for Turkish TV dramas has produced increased supply. In the last five years, Turkish TV viewers have been subjected to hundreds of new productions which repeatedly deal with the same topics and liberally employ recurrent themes with little imaginative effort due to confidence in their star casts.

Early critics of the abundant supply went to the trouble of counting the number of shows on domestic TV channels for one whole season, reaching three-digit numbers. The same critics complained about the declining cinematographic qualities as a result of pressing weekly schedules, which stemmed from the amount of competition. “In the U.S., a 22-minute comedy is shot within 28 days. In Turkey, we are urged to shoot a 100-minute episode in six days,” said Cemcir.

The story for “İşler Güçler” developed out of a documentary project director Aydemir was writing to cast the same three actors.

“I was planning a documentary series called ‘Meslek Hikayeleri’ [Professional Stories], in which we would pick three professions each week and interview a few people in that profession. I was also writing funny parts to connect each interview, because I wanted the documentary to have a degree of humor. In the long run, the project turned into the script for ‘İşler Güçler.’”

The show’s plot is the career story of three actors who get hired by an extremely unprofessional producer for the making of a documentary titled “Professional Stories.” As the three characters strive to do their job properly, despite a lack of funds and professional conditions, the show’s plot changes into a funny employment story about the TV business. The fictional documentary is of such desperately low quality that it never gets an airing, and the channel – which is named after the real broadcaster of the TV show, namely Star TV – repeatedly airs Sylvester Stallone’s “Rambo” films in its place.

“In this episode, we’re getting our revenge on Rambo,” Aydemir said. In last week’s episode, the show opened with the opening scene of “Rambo 4” as a joke to the audience, and the full film followed the airing of the show. On being asked whether this yielded any copyright infringement issues, Aydemir said he had asked for the necessary permission.

Breaking free of the vicious circle

These four people have previously collaborated on a few TV shows, none of which continued past the middle of their first season. Aydemir and Cengiz know each other from a web portal where they used to upload their short films during their amateur years. They meet with Cemcir coincidentally while they were shooting “Kurban” (Sacrifice), which was later aired as a four-episode mini-series on state-run TRT during the Kurban Bayram Holiday.

Kural and Cemcir’s story is as funny as it can get. “While I was shooting ‘Gazi’ [Veteran] for ATV in 2007, [Cemcir] joined us as a guest actor. But we did not meet during filming because we never shared a scene. He played in only four episodes and then the show was withdrawn from the screen after the airing of the 19th episode,” Kural said.

Cemcir picked up telling the story of the duo’s collaborations where his friend left off. “In 2008, I started to work on another show called ‘Bir Bulut Olsam’ [If only I was a cloud] and [Kural] joined us as a guest actor. After the 16th episode was aired the channel cancelled the show,” Cemcir said.

The duo also shared the lead role in Aydemir’s 2011 movie “Çalgı Çengi.” That same year, Cengiz joined the trio in the shooting of another TV show titled “Üsküdar’a Giderken,” which was named after a Turkish classical music song, broadcast by Kanal D until only the 14th episode.

“While the shooting of the show continued I was offered a part on another show and to be able to do both of these [shows] I had to resign from my post as a civil servant. On the day my resignation was confirmed, I was told the show was being cancelled from the screen and the other project was cancelled before even being broadcast.” This chain of misfortune is the main inspiration behind their current project and where the plot derives its humor from. It is certain that with their final project they have broken free of the vicious circle. »

Source : Hürriyet Daily News

« Turkish TV series to pay cash fine » – Hürriyet Daily News

« The Radio and Television Supreme Council (RTÜK) has handed down a cash fine to the Behzat Ç television series due to what the council deemed inappropriate language and content. The detective series has been warned before over its alleged use of improper language. The fine from RTÜK came after Behzat Ç producers continued to use language RTÜK have defined as improper.

RTÜK also claimed the fine was a result of the series not being proper for Turkish family life. According to RTÜK the language and behavior of the series’ characters creates problems for the Turkish family style.

Management of Star TV earlier made an official statement denying rumors about a broadcast ban for Behzat Ç. Ömer Özgüner, the channel’s controller, said they did not have the slightest intention to stop broadcasting the show before its scripted end.

The head of Turkish Green Crescent complained that the main character of the show, detective Behzat Ç, was not representative of the Turkish police with his alcohol and cigarette use. He claimed the series was doomed to be banned from broadcast soon. »

Source : Hürriyet Daily News

« Star turn » – C21 media


Cem Aydin. Source : C21 Media

« Following its purchase of Star TV last year, Turkey’s Dogus Media Group is focusing on rebuilding the mainstream channel with original and international productions. CEO Cem Aydin spoke to Michael Pickard.

When its plans to add a home-grown mainstream network to its portfolio of thematic channels were stifled by the economic crisis in 2009, Turkey’s Dogus Media Group was forced to put its ambitions on hold.

Its desire to expand remained, however, and the group moved its focus from launching a network to acquiring an existing one. In line with this new strategy, in October 2011, Dogus paid Turkish conglomerate Dogan Media Group US$327m for its entertainment network Star TV.

Dogan originally bought Star for US$306.5m in 2005 after previous owner Uzan Media folded in 2003 with debts of US$6bn. Star joined Dogus’s stable of seven other channels, which run alongside websites, radio stations, magazines and a publishing imprint. The business is part of the wider Dogus Group of 122 companies, operating in sectors as diverse as banking, construction, real estate and energy.

Explaining the Star purchase, Cem Aydin, CEO of Dogus Media Group, says the firm had become a “pioneer” in thematic channels and wanted to try its hand in a “new and more competitive market” – mainstream TV.

“We worked on a project named TV-en for almost two years,” he says. “But unfortunately, due to the financial turmoil, the project was postponed for an indefinite period. In 2011, when new advertising opportunities arose for mainstream channels, this was the right time to take a project from the rack. Turkey’s first private TV channel, Star TV, was on sale and so rather than building a TV channel from scratch we decided to rebuild Star TV.”

Dogus Media Group was founded in 1999 with the acquisition of NTV, Turkey’s first 24-hour news channel, which had launched in 1996. Business and entertainment channel CNBC-e debuted in 2000 while sports net NTV Spor, music channels Kral TV and Kral Pop, Hindi news net HDe and entertainment net e2 completed the line-up until Star was added last year.

Dogus wasn’t the only company affected by the economic crash, as the entire Turkish media industry faced cuts after a period of expansion, but Aydin says the country’s recovery is now gathering pace. “We were affected but the recovery process has been fast,” he says. “We expect the ad market to grow by 20.4% in 2012 and bring fresh blood to the media industry in general. We aim to increase our ad share in the market until 2013 and keep it around 11.2% afterwards. Obviously, TV still occupies the largest portion of ad share and the acquisition of Star TV has enabled us to double our market share projections for the next three years.”

Advertising sales have also been impacted by the collapse of the Turkish ratings system, which was abandoned last year amid allegations the personal details of some panelists were leaked, which potentially left them open to bribes to change their viewing habits.

A new ratings system will launch in May, but Aydin says: “We’re in limbo right now. This is not good for the sector. Advertisers need measured metrics; they want to see who they reach. And the ad price is also determined through ratings of the time slot. We broadcasters need the metrics to see how our shows are doing and also to talk to the advertisers.”

Despite some signs of economic growth, Dogus does not intend to venture back into acquisitions, as Aydin says picking up new networks is “not a priority for us right now. Improving Star TV, according to our goals and vision, ranks higher on our agenda and we need to concentrate on this objective,” he says.

In terms of content, Dogus’s networks have found success with both home-grown and imported shows. On CNBC-e, worldwide hits including the BBC’s Merlin and Doctor Who, US network CBS’s comedy How I Met Your Mother, Starz original series Spartacus: Blood & Sand and HBO’s Game of Thrones have won strong audiences, while NTV’s documentary hour on Sundays and local news show Close Up are also popular.

Meanwhile, e2 has a slate of international productions including HBO’s Treme and BBC comedy Come Fly With Me, as well as US talkshows such as The Ellen Show, The Conan O’Brien Show and The Tonight Show with Jay Leno.

At Star, Ottoman Empire drama Magnificent Century (Muhtesem Yuzyil), made by TIMS Productions, was acquired from rival Show TV, in part to highlight the takeover completed by Dogus, and viewers have followed. “We obviously treated this transfer as a launch tool to attract attention to the change taking place at Star,” says Aydin. “It is doing very well since the story is quite appealing and tragic and it has a loyal audience. But Star will create its own productions soon enough.

“For the past three or four years, historical series have been on the rise, occupying a serious position in the entertainment world and attracting significant attention to certain periods of history. We believe this trend will continue for a few more years as there is quite a lot of historical material that can be used.”

Other popular shows airing on Star include Iffet, a drama about a woman who is betrayed by her lover; and One Man, One Woman (Bir Erkek, Bir Kadin), the Turkish adaptation of Canadian comedy series Un Gars, Une Fille.

Gameshows are also finding viewers and Star airs a version of Israeli format Still Standing, under the title Eyvah Dusuyorum, which is produced by Endemol Turkey. The channel is also prepping a Turkish version of US classic Jeopardy!. “In terms of primetime series, locally originated productions have been dominant until recently,” says Aydin.

One notable exception to this is Kanal D’s remake of long-running US drama Desperate Housewives, which is running as Umutsuz Ev Kadinlari, produced by Medyapim.

“We are always looking to acquire successful international content,” says Aydin. “Adapting scripts is a rising trend but it is quite difficult to find stories that fit the local culture. Producing original dramas will still be the priority of the sector.”

The number of programmes exported from Turkey is also on the rise, as shown by Magnificent Century’s roll-out into more than 40 territories worldwide by distributor Global Agency. “Turkish series have become quite popular abroad, especially in the Middle East. It is to such an extent that the popularity of these series has boosted interest in Turkey, creating a new line of tourism. It is an exciting but understandable development, given the proximity of the cultures.

“This growth will continue as long as series dominate the primetime hour. But will this spread to other regions? The answer to this lies in shortening the duration, the variety and the production quality of the projects,” explains Aydin.

“Primetime is dominated by Turkish series that run for three hours, with ad slots. A show that runs for almost three hours every week has the possibility of falling into a vicious circle and, currently, the Turkish television industry is suffering from this fatigue. It is having a negative effect, because in order to fill that time space, the stories become longer than usual and lose their dramatic effect.”

As Dogus has bought into Turkey’s mainstream television market with its acquisition of Star, so too have international broadcasters, which are looking to exploit one of the fastest growing TV markets in the world.

Discovery, National Geographic and Disney all have a presence in the country, and while not directly competing against Dogus’s stable of channels, their presence is a sign of the value of the market to foreign broadcasters.

However, Aydin says this competition is not something local networks have to fear, but is something they should embrace. “NTV has been the pioneer of news channels in Turkey by positioning itself as ‘the news channel of Turkey.’ But recently we have had international companies entering the scene, such as Al Jazeera,” says Aydin. “The existence of such competitors in the market is valuable and beneficial to raise standards. The same is also true for players like TNT and Fox in the entertainment world. Such international companies spice up the course of Turkish media.”

Since officially relaunching Star in January after completing the acquisition, Dogus is now preparing for a “second launch” this fall as the growth of the channel forms the focal point of the media group’s ambitions for the immediate future. Part of this plan is to follow the changing audience landscape in Turkey and, in particular, how younger viewers are taking their viewing habits online.

However, Aydin says traditional TV is still the main medium. “The most significant change in Turkey has been witnessed with the expansion of new media, with the mass penetration of internet into households,” he says. “Nevertheless, television is still the main source of information and entertainment.

“Turkish television is quite up to date with what happens in the international arena. The younger audience, on the other hand, is following TV online and has created its own digital entertainment world. We strive to create content that appeals to these youngsters as their habits will be determining the trends of the next few years.” »

Source : C21 media

« Sultan conquers 40 countries’ television » – Hürriyet Daily News

Source : Hürriyet Daily News

« The Turkish TV series “Muhteşem Yüzyıl” (The Magnificent Century), which has become one of the most popular productions in Turkey and increased people’s interest in Ottoman history, is opening to the world, daily Radikal reported.

No other Turkish series, which will be broadcast in 40 countries this month, is carried in so many areas around the world.

“Muhteşem Yüzyıl” was introduced to the world last year during the MIPTV Television Fair in Cannes. The series drew great interest from many international channels and will now be distributed in 40 countries, 22 out of which are in the Middle East.

The series was first broadcast overseas in Slovakia and Czech Republic and became very successful, reaching a 45 percent rating within a short time. Last week, the series began airing in Macedonia and was soon drawing 32 percent of viewers and bringing its carrier to the top of the country’s ratings competition. It has also gained a large number of viewers in the Middle East.

Goal is 60 countries

“Muhteşem Yüzyıl” is also opening up to the world in new regions as a significant brand; the goal of the series is to reach 60 countries this year, according to officials.

The series will start broadcasting on Russian channel Domashniy on Jan. 14, Anatolia news agency reported.

Long popular on Russian social sharing websites, the series was introduced by the channel with the motto, “Palace decoration, magnificent dresses and unbelievable success on earth. The story of concubine Roksalana, who stole the heart of the sultan: Roksalana and Süleyman.”

Starring Halil Ergenç, Meryem Sarah Üzerli, Okan Yalabık and Nebahat Çehre, the series moved to Star TV this month and added actor Mehmet Günsur to its team.

Produced by TIM’s Productions and directed by the Taylan brothers, the series’ script is written by Meral Okay. »

Source : Hürriyet Daily News

« Doğan says no longer considering media sale » – Sabah

« Doğan Group is no longer considering sales within its media group, the group’s founder and honorary chairman Aydin Doğan stated.

The Doğan Group, whose Doğan Yayin media group has had to cope with multi-billion lira tax fine cases, sold two dailies Vatan and Milliyet and the Star television channel under a recent restructuring process. Doğan’s statement clarified that the group has no intentions to sell Kanal D, Hürriyet, Posta or CNN Turk. »

Source : Sabah

« Talking Turkey » – C21 Media

« Costume drama Magnificent Century is racking up international sales for distributor Global Agency as Turkish series make their mark in Central and Eastern Europe, reports Michael Pickard.

When Russian broadcast group CTC Media announced its third-quarter financial results this month, hidden among the figures was some positive news for Kazakhstan’s Channel 31.

In the past three months, the channel recorded an all-time high average quarterly audience of 17.7%, strengthening its position as the second most-watched channel in the country. Viewing figures rose from 11.4% in Q3 2010 – a 55% year-on-year increase.

Anton Kudryashov, CTC Media’s CEO, said: “Growth in CTC Media’s other markets continue to exceed expectations, mainly due to a substantial increase in the average target audience shares of Channel 31 in Kazakhstan and the dynamic growth in scale and reach of CTC International and our new media activities.” Channel 31′s performance was put down to three factors: local productions, a strong movie line-up and the success of Turkish primetime series in its schedule.

RTL Televizija in Croatia has also made a mark with Turkish drama. The popularity of TMC Film’s Binbir Gece (1,001 Nights), first shown on Kanal D, and crime drama Ezel, produced by Ay Yapim for diginet Show TV, helped spur the network to commission its first original weekly drama. The Windrose, produced by FremantleMedia’s Croatian unit, is currently on air.

One reason for the success of Turkish scripted series in Croatia and Kazakhstan has been the audiences’ ability to relate to the culture and traditions they portray – which they are less likely to do with shows from the US, for example. This trend has sent another Turkish drama series, Ottoman Empire-set Magnificent Century, into almost a dozen countries worldwide since Istanbul-based distributor Global Agency began shopping it earlier this year.

The series follows the reign of Sultan Suleiman, who ruled for 46 years during the 16th century, and his attempt to make the Ottomans invincible. The drama was given massive promotion at Discop Budapest in June, while characters from the show could also be spotted walking around the Palais de Festivals in Cannes during Mipcom.

The show, from TIMS Productions, is in its second season on Turkey’s Show TV. However, in January it will transfer mid-season to another free-to-air channel, Star TV, following the latter’s takeover by Dogus Group, owner of the Turkish version of CNBC.

Internationally, the first season has been picked up by Prva for transmission in Serbia and Montenegro, and by Kanal 5 in Macedonia. Viewers can also watch the series in Russia (Domashny), Azerbaijan (Lider TV), Slovakia (Markiza), the Czech Republic (Barrandov), Romania (Kanal D), Kazakhstan (Khabar) and Albania (Albanian Screen), while Dubai TV will air it in 22 Arab-speaking countries.

Magnificent Century had a pre-production budget of €3.5m (US$4.7m), while €2m was spent on sets and costumes alone.

, CEO of Global Agency, says: “Magnificent Century represents the first time a series made in Turkey has been given an international release.

“When we launched it at MipTV earlier this year, we felt it would sell to a number of territories because not only is the story interesting but it’s a very expensive production from Turkey and has international quality. It’s been so popular because it’s based on a true story. It’s mostly about intrigue in the palace. They are all true events in history. It has even been sold to Romania, which is a very difficult market to enter and has never acquired a Turkish show before.” The success of Magnificent Century demonstrates the high production values now instilled in Turkish scripted series, Pinto says.

However, while more dramas will be coming out of the country, they will not be limited to historical costume series, Pinto adds. “Turkey has really good-quality shows nowadays,” says Pinto. “They’re a great alternative to Latin American series and are being shown in primetime. Our goal is to sell Magnificent Century to 40 territories by the end of 2012.”

The show was originally commissioned for a two-season run, though a third is believed to be in the planning stages. “It might have a third season but I don’t think more than that,” adds Pinto. “The series is based on true events, so after three years we will have the finale.

“Turkish drama is getting very popular, especially in Central and Eastern Europe. Binbir Gece was also very popular. It’s expensive (for such countries) to produce their own shows and this is better to buy and dub. It’s perfect for primetime. This is the first big-budget series that’s been bought by so many countries. In Turkey, people feel proud about this because, finally, Turkey is part of the international entertainment business.”

There’s no doubt that Turkish drama is making its international mark, as the sales of Magnificent Century show. However, it remains to be seen whether this series will break out of Eastern Europe and on to Western screens, though that is certainly Pinto’s ambition. And if US networks can buy scripted formats from Israel and Colombia to adapt locally, why not Turkey? »

Source : C21 Media

« Dogan offloads Star TV » – C21 media

« Turkish conglom Dogan Media Group has sold entertainment network Star TV to a rival for US$327m.

Dogus Yayin Holdings will take on 99.9% of the channel, which broadcasts entertainment formats, dramas and sport and was Turkey’s first private TV network, subject to local competition clearance.

It will pay Dogan subsidiary Isil Television Broadcasting an initial US$151m, with the outstanding US$176m paid off in instalments over the next two years, according to a filing to the Istanbul Stock Exchange this week.

Dogan originally bought Star for US$306.5m six years ago at a keenly contested auction after previous owner Uzan Media folded in 2003 under the weight of its US$6bn debts.

But it has recently been struggling to cover a multibillion-dollar bill relating to fines, taxes and interest imposed by government, which some commentators have claimed could be politically motivated.

It was forced to sell off Star after failing to comply with new laws prohibiting any one media firm from controlling more than 30% of the advertising market.

Others Dogan assets, including daily newspapers, have already been shed. Kanal D was also on the block but reports today suggest the Star deal may end the sales process.

Meanwhile, Dogus rivals Dogan in terms of scale but its 123 companies are spread across the media, finance, automotive, tourism, real estate, construction and energy industries.

Media arm Dogus Media Group owns news net NTV and has struck partnerships with National Geographic, CNBC and Condé Nast and has more than 1,100 employees. »

Source : C21 media

 

« Doğan Yayın sells Star TV to Doğuş Group for $327 million » – Today’s Zaman

In a written statement released on Monday through the Public Disclosure Forum (KAP), Doğan Yayın said the company had reached an agreement with Doğuş for the sale of Star. “We signed a deal for the sale of our shares in Star TV late on Monday with Doğuş Group,” the statement said. Doğuş will pay $151 million in cash and the remaining $176 million will be paid in 24-month installments to DYH. Doğuş takes over Star from Nov. 1.

Doğan had to pay the Finance Ministry TL 294.2 million in fines levied on the company in 2009 for alleged irregularities in its tax returns. In alleged efforts to raise funds to compensate for the tax fines it had to pay, DYH in April sold its Milliyet and Vatan dailies to the Demirören-Karacan joint venture’s DK Gazetecilik ve Yayıncılık A.Ş. for $74 million. Doğan last year said it would eventually sell all of the companies in its media business, except for the Hürriyet daily, within three months in an attempt to pay off the crippling tax fines. »

Source : Today’s Zaman