“New period TV series accused of distorting well-known history” – Today’s Zaman

Sami, a major character in the series “Seksenler” (The 80s), is seen in this 2012 photo. (PHOTO SUNDAY’S ZAMAN)

By HATICE KÜBRA KULA

“New period television series launched in an attempt to share the history of the country with viewers, who have tuned in by the millions, have been on the receiving end of harsh criticism after claims that the series distorts the truth about historical events and figures.

The wave of harsh criticisms began with the launch of the TV series “Muhteşem Yüzyıl” (Magnificent Century), which is based on the life of Ottoman Sultan Süleyman the Magnificent and his love for Hürrem Sultan, a former slave who eventually became the sultan’s wife. Critics have argued that the costumes the actors and actresses wear in the series do not reflect the design of the clothing worn by members of the Ottoman dynasty but are rather similar to those used in the historical English TV series “Tudors,” which is about the reign and marriages of King Henry VIII. Also labeled by many as a “fake Tudors,” Magnificent Century has been criticized for its plot, which focuses on the harem life of Süleyman, about which, according to historians, there is no detailed account.

The negative reaction to historical series continued after “Bir Zamanlar Osmanlı: Kıyam” (Once Upon A Time in the Ottoman Empire: Rebellion), a series about significant events that took place in 18th-century Ottoman times such as the Patrona Halil Rebellion, started broadcasting in 2012. Viewers initially said the series, which was launched as a rival to Magnificent Century, was initially devoid of realistic characters and a consistent plot. The series underwent significant changes in the past year, including a change in the plot, and technical problems were also solved by producers.

Other television series such as “Seksenler” (The 80s), which revolves around the lives of people living in the1980s in the aftermath of a bloody coup d’état and “Öyle Bir Geçer Zaman ki” (As Time Goes By), which concentrates on the conflicts among members of a family living in the 1960s, have received similar criticism from historians.

Such series, however, have also revived people’s interest in historical figures and events. There has been a sharp increase in the publication and sale of books about history, according to historians. Women’s demand for accessories and jewelry worn by the main characters of these series has created new market opportunities. Historians have started to hold discussions about the figures and incidents in a number of TV programs with the aim of correcting the mistakes in the period TV series.

Ahmet Yaşar, a lecturer from Fatih University’s department of history, commented on the revival of interest in history through these series, saying they help people gain knowledge about history. However, Yaşar also criticized the series, noting that their producers can make changes or additions to historical events in order to increase ratings, adding that such changes or additions should only be made if there is no exaggeration. Yaşar said most people watch these series as if they reflect historical realities without questioning their authenticity, which makes it more important that they consult factual resources such as history texts.

Another historian, who wanted to remain anonymous, stated that the ideological views of the series’ producers also affect the way the characters and plot are rendered. The historian further commented that such TV series have unfortunately become a part of popular culture.

Followers of TV series, speaking to Sunday’s Zaman, talked about their positive and negative views on such series. Tülin Öksüz, a history gradate, noted that the series most of the time only focus on some particular figures and incidents, failing to talk about the lives of the common people, in which people are interested. Aynur Sezen, a fan of Magnificent Century, stated that the series contributes to her knowledge of history although at times the facts are not correct and events that did not occur in a particular period are depicted, which negatively affects the credibility of the series.

Zeliha Karlı, a housewife, noted that historical facts are merely touched upon with elaboration, which is why she chooses to avoid watching them. “However, I wonder if details about the historic figures and incidents were shared in a factual and detailed manner, would they be watched by as many people?” she said. “It is only the series that are set in more recent history that are credible for me since I know what happened during those times and can decide if the incidents are true or distorted,” noted Karlı.”

Source : Today’s Zaman

“Macedonia bans Turkish soap operas” – Hürriyet Daily News

“Macedonia is currently passing a bill to restrict broadcasts of Turkish TV series during the day and at prime time in order to reduce the Turkish impact on Macedonian society, daily Habertürk has reported.

“Our own programs have started being broadcast after midnight because of Turkish soap operas. On every channel I see a Turkish soap opera like ‘Muhteşem Yüzyıl’ [The Magnificent Century], ‘Ezel,’ or ‘Binbir Gece’ [A Thousand and One Nights]. They’re all fascinating, but to stay under Turkish servitude for 500 years is enough,” Information and Society Minister Ivo Ivanovski said.

Turkish series will gradually be removed and replaced by national programs, according to the new bill.”

Source : Hürriyet Daily News

“‘It’s not real,’ scholars tell critics of historical dramas” – Hürriyet

Historical dramas, such as ‘Muhteşem Yüzyıl’ (The Magnificent Century), are fictionalized accounts of the lives of sultans rather than historically accurate documentaries, according to academics. Source : Hürriyet

“Academics gather to discuss the increasing popularity of historical TV series in Turkey, noting the distinction between fact and fiction is often misunderstood by audiences. “The fictional side needs much more work because no one knows how a sultan approaches his wife,’ says an academic

It is important for television viewers to understand that historical dramas, such as the wildly popular “Muhteşem Yüzyıl” (The Magnificent Century), are fictionalized accounts of the lives of sultans rather than historically accurate documentaries, according to academics.

“Turkish people confuse the idea of TV series and documentary. A TV series is a different thing than a documentary,” said Erhan Afyoncu, a professor on the board of the Atatürk High Institute of Culture, Language and History, as well as a former consultant for “The Magnificent Century.”

Fictional side

Some have issued criticisms of historical series, Afyoncu said during a recent symposium in the northern province of Tokat, but added that it was difficult to produce such series.

“Historic TV series have a reality side as well as a fictional side,” the former consultant said. “The fictional side needs much more work. You have to create a fiction. You know the political events from history and you stick to this reality when making a TV series. But no one knows how a sultan approached his wife or how he behaved in daily life. This is why you have to fictionalize it. We did it in ‘Magnificent Century.’ There were discussions about sending Süleyman the Magnificent on journeys in the TV series. But I added these journey scenes to the series. But it is interesting that the series had lower ratings in these episodes.” […]

Source : Hürriyet

“‘It’s not real,’ scholars tell critics of historical dramas” – Hürriyet Daily News

Historical dramas, such as ‘Muhteşem Yüzyıl’ (The Magnificent Century), are fictionalized accounts of the lives of sultans rather than historically accurate documentaries, according to academics.
. Source : Hürriyet

“Academics gather to discuss the increasing popularity of historical TV series in Turkey, noting the distinction between fact and fiction is often misunderstood by audiences. “The fictional side needs much more work because no one knows how a sultan approaches his wife,’ says an academic.

It is important for television viewers to understand that historical dramas, such as the wildly popular “Muhteşem Yüzyıl” (The Magnificent Century), are fictionalized accounts of the lives of sultans rather than historically accurate documentaries, according to academics.

“Turkish people confuse the idea of TV series and documentary. A TV series is a different thing than a documentary,” said Erhan Afyoncu, a professor on the board of the Atatürk High Institute of Culture, Language and History, as well as a former consultant for “The Magnificent Century.”

Fictional side

Some have issued criticisms of historical series, Afyoncu said during a recent symposium in the northern province of Tokat, but added that it was difficult to produce such series.

“Historic TV series have a reality side as well as a fictional side,” the former consultant said. “The fictional side needs much more work. You have to create a fiction. You know the political events from history and you stick to this reality when making a TV series. But no one knows how a sultan approached his wife or how he behaved in daily life. This is why you have to fictionalize it. We did it in ‘Magnificent Century.’ There were discussions about sending Süleyman the Magnificent on journeys in the TV series. But I added these journey scenes to the series. But it is interesting that the series had lower ratings in these episodes.”

Afyoncu said state-owned television channel Turkish Radio and Television (TRT) had made historic TV series but that they had not attracted much public interest.

“TRT made TV series without women and their intrigues. People criticize other TV series but do not watch these ones. This is what I don’t understand,” Afyoncu said.

Secrecy of privacy

Fictionalization is occasionally necessary when there is a dearth of historical documents, said Professor Ali Açıkel, another symposium participant and a historian at Gaziosmanpaşa University, but added that these dramatizations should not contradict historical facts, general customs, traditions and law.

Scenarios set in historical times should not be infused with the perceptions of the present, Açıkel said, adding that ethical values should also be reflected in perceptions.

“The secrecy of private life should be respected. Otherwise, it is disrespectful to the private life of the Ottoman sultans. TV series are based on fiction when documents and information is insufficient. Documentaries aim to inform people according to a chronological order. There is no fiction in documentaries but some parts of TV series are fictional.”

Source : Hürriyet Daily News

 

“Turkish ‘TV series spring’ continues” – Hürriyet Daily News

The TV series such as Dila Hanım, are expected to attract lots of viewers both natoanally and internationally. The series which are recently started feature famous actors and actresses from Turkish televisions.

Article by Aslı Öymen

“The recent developments in the Turkey’s TV series sector reveal the increase in the audience. Each new production sold to foreign countries. Cannes’ MIPCOM fair unveils the latest situation […]

Turks are everywhere

As a Turkish person, I must admit that the first thing that attracted my attention and made me feel proud were the huge billboards and banners of various Turkish T.V. series that I encountered in the fair area, on the streets, and in cafes. The English translations of our T.V. series’ attracted me the most in those banners: Time Goes by (Öyle Bir Geçer Zaman ki), Magnificent Century (Muhteşem Yüzyıl), Fatmagül (Fatmagül’ün Suçu ne?), Fallen Angel (Kötü Yol), My Partner Knows (Ben Bilmem Eşim Bilir).

However, Kuzey Güney, literally meaning North and South, was not translated and was instead left as it is in Turkish.

Until a few years ago, no Turkish television station stands could be found at MIP apart from the official Turkish Radio and Television (TRT), let alone billboards and banners. Things have changed in a very short time. This year there were five Turkish T.V. channels with stands in the fair: TRT, Kanal D, Show T.V., Star, and ATV. Along with those, various independent production and distribution companies were represented. While the distributors were actively pushing sales during the daytime, they organized cool parties at nights, which were very popular.

‘Turkish series spring’

With its first attempt to expanding abroad coming with “Gümüş” in 2007, Turkish T.V. series first invaded the screens of the Arab world. Today, about 150 Turkish series’ are being exported to 73 countries across Asia, Europe and Africa. Sales of these are estimated to reach 100 million dollars annually, from just 1 million dollars in 2007.

After last week’s MIPCOM journey, Turks are sure to expand their sphere of influence even more. This year, our series also attracted the attention of the Far East, with demands coming from Korea and China. American company NBC Universal bought the format rights of “Aşk-ı Memnu” in order to distribute it to Latin America, which was once the most prominent series exporter.

We also set one of the best examples of format rights and adaptation with “Umutsuz Ev Kadınları,” Kanal D’s adaptation of internationally-known American series Desperate Housewives. This was a successful adaptation that corresponded to the taste of Turkish audience.

Currently, Turkish series are being sold abroad for amounts between 5,000 and 125,000 dollars per episode. This means that “an expensive series” with 100 episodes costs 12.5 million dollars for a foreign broadcaster. On the other hand, format prices are considerably low. The format price for one episode is generally between 5,000 and 10,000 dollars.”

Best thing that has happened to series

One of the lectures in MIPCOM was on Turkish T.V. series, titled “Turkish drama: the new delight.”

Kanal D’s editor-in-chief Pelin Diztaş, Global Agency’s CEO İzzet Pinto, the head of Ay Production Kerem Çatay, United Arab Emirates-based GM Productions’ head Fadi İsmail, and Lebanon K Partners’ distributor Nabil Kazan all attended the lecture.

During the lecture, the subject of the price of Turkish series’ came up, and İsmail and Kazan complained about the increasing prices. During his speech, Fadi İsmail said: “Turkish series’ are the best thing that has happened to Arab series,’ and the Arabs will learn to make their own series soon.” He warned that this would endanger the future of Turkish T.V. series’ in Arab countries, but this was not accepted by other attendants. Pelin Diztaş argued that making series’ could be learned, but finding and writing a plot was the most difficult part. “This is very abundant in our geography. Turkey is a country with abundant traumatic material, with a rich geography and a significant emotional dimension,” she said. As can be seen in the Desperate Housewives example, those learning to make T.V. series will shoot their own series with plots they have bought. I don’t know how long the learning process will last for, but when the localization trend is used it will become unavoidable for series to be framed in a certain format.

Source : Hürriyet Daily News

“Incest: The last taboo in Turkish cinema and TV” – Hürriyet Daily News

The movie, ‘When Derin Falls,’ is about a 8 -year-old girl, who tries connecting with her father in every possbile way, including encounters with sexual undertones. Source : Hürriyet

“The recent controversy around a Turkish film dealing with incest reminded many of a similar brouhaha over another film on incest two years ago, as well as Deputy Prime Minister Bülent Arınç’s warning to TV producers to keep incest away from screens

Red flags were raised amid media delirium last week when the head of the jury for a national film festival openly condemned a movie on moral grounds, allegedly threatening to ban the movie from entering the national competition.

The festival was the Golden Orange Film Festival, the biggest one in Turkey. The head of the jury was the ever-controversial Hülya Avşar, who had made headlines in the summer when a member of the jury resigned in protest over her selection, questioning her judgment and knowledge of film.

The film, which became the most talked-about film of the festival, was director Çağatay Tosun’s sophomore feature “Derin Düşün-ce” (a word play that could mean “Deep Thought” or “When Derin Falls,” referring to the little protagonist’s name). And the controversial subject matter was incest, a no-go area in Turkish cinema, television, literature and pop culture. […]

Incest is indeed a taboo that is ignored and remains invisible in the media, in cinema and on TV. And if there is a hint of incest, censorship comes in all forms and from all places. Sometimes it’s the audience, sometimes the head of the jury, and at other times, it’s the deputy prime minister.

Last spring, Deputy Prime Minister Bülent Arınç made a statement out of the blue in an attempt to put into action his conservative views on relationships (and probably the views of his fellow members of the pro-Islamic ruling Justice and Development Party – AKP) as depicted in dozens of TV series.

“Some of the marginal themes seen in recent TV series, such as relationships between people of the opposite sex and incest, have become cause for serious criticism, upsetting society. We have to take seriously the criticisms regarding these series. These themes have to be reassessed,” said Arınç, stealing headlines for a few days if not actually making much of an impact on the plots in the series.

It was not that difficult to trace the inappropriate relationships between the sexes he was referring to, as infidelity, marital rape and abusive relationships are not new to recent TV series in Turkey. But incest? The closest reference Arınç could have in mind was the series “Eve Düşen Yıldırım” (Lightning Strikes Home), which features two cousins falling in love; it’s not an unusual situation, and one that is definitely not found immoral in most parts of Turkey. The story, on the other hand, was not an original one written for TV. “Eve Düşen Yıldırım” was an adaptation of Turkish writer Nahid Sırrı Örik’s 1934 novel of the same name. In fact, it was not that uncommon to see cousins falling in love and marrying in the Turkish novels of the early 20th century, seen in such classics like Reşat Nuri Güntekin’s 1922 novel “Çalıkuşu” (The Wren) or “Aşk-ı Memnu” (Forbidden Love) by Halit Ziya Uşaklıgil, serialized in 1900. Of course, when the latter was adapted to TV to huge success in 2008.”

Source : Hürriyet Daily News

“Works continue to give TV series to foreigners for free ” – Hürriyet Daily News

“Following a decision taken by from the Culture and Tourism Ministry, Turkish T.V. series’ will start to be aired in a number of countries free of charge. Vice Culture and Tourism Minister Abdurrahman Arıcı has announced that Turkish series’ will be aired abroad with the support of the ministry, in the interest of promoting Turkey in foreign countries.

“With T.V. series’ we can enter every house and spread the influence of Turkish culture,” he said, adding that tourists coming from Middle Eastern countries often visited the venues where T.V. shows were shot.

Turkey has signed deals with seven companies that market T.V. series, films and documentaries to the world, Arıcı said, speaking at the October meeting of the Skal Antalya Club.

According to an article in daily Radikal, while Turkey’s T.V. exports currently amount to a total of $60 million, and the aim is to increase this amount to $100 million. “Magnificent Century” (Muhteşem Yüzyıl) is among the most popular, and the ministry would particularly like to air this series in Kyrgyzstan, said Arıcı.

The importance of industry

At the same meeting, Istanbul Chamber of Commerce board member İsrafil Kuralay said the industry had reached a very important position.

The Daily News has previously reported that Greek audiences in particular have learned a number of Turkish words thanks to the series that are aired in their country. Turkish series such as “Magnificent Century,” “Sıla,” “Asi,” “Acı Hayat” (Bitter Life), “Deniz Yıldızı” (Starfish) and “Lale Devri” (Tulip Age) are among those being shown in Greece, and Greek people have thus started to pick up simple words and phrases in Turkish such as “Hello,” “How are you?” and “My dear.”

“Magnificent Century” is being aired in Greece on OBN, one of the most watched stations in the country, under the title “Süleyman Velicanstveni” (Süleyman the Magnificent). It was also the highest rated T.V. series in Bosnia Herzegovina on its first day of broadcast.”

Source : Hürriyet Daily News

“Greeks tune in to Turkish soap opera, despite critics views” – SES Türkiye

Article by Andy Dabilis and Erisa Dautaj for SES Türkiye in Athens and Istanbul

“Greek nationalists view the series as being a Turkish invasion of sorts, while others see opportunities for beneficial cultural exchange.

Greeks have been enthralled by Turkish TV series “The Magnificent Century” in recent months. The series is comprised of historical recreations of 16th-century Sultan Suleiman’s life and slick soap opera-like tales of intrigue and family drama, prompting alarmed nationalists to issue warnings that fans should stop watching.

Greek viewers said they love the vicarious thrill of seeing how rich Turks live, and the shows make Istanbul seem an irresistible place to visit, while others relate to the problems of ordinary Turks.[…]

The series has become so popular that nationalist Thessaloniki Bishop Anthimos and the neo-Nazi Golden Dawn party have both condemned the show and urged Greeks not to watch.[…]

The Turkish shows’ prevalence is also a matter of economics as Greek television stations find it less expensive to buy them than to produce their own.[…]

Other Turkish shows such as “Ezel,” “Ask ve Ceza” and “Ask-I Memnu” show panoramic shots of Istanbul, alluring to potential visitors.[…]”

Source : SES Turkiye

Protégé : Istanbul et la production audiovisuelle turque : une approche territoriale (extrait)

Cette publication est protégée par un mot de passe. Pour la voir, veuillez saisir votre mot de passe ci-dessous :

“Egypt plans to launch TV channel broadcasting in Turkish” – Today’s Zaman

“Egypt is planning to launch a TV channel broadcasting in Turkish, an Egyptian minister has said.

Egyptian Information Minister Salah Abdul-Maqsoud told a correspondent from the Anatolia news agency in Cairo on Wednesday that during his visit to Turkey he had meetings with President Abdullah Gül and Prime Minister Recep Tayyip Erdoğan and that the two parties agreed to cooperate in the areas of culture and media.

There was a TV channel in Turkey broadcasting in Arabic, he said, adding that they are also planning to open a TV channel in Egypt broadcasting in Turkish.”

Source : Today’s Zaman

Documentary : “Creativity and the capitalist city. A struggle for affordable space in Amsterdam” a film by Tino Buchholz

Text from the official webpage of the documentary :  

“Creativity is fancy, glamorous and desirable. Who can be against creativity? At the same time it is used selectively for economic purposes and consists of precarious and hard work.

In this film, the search for creativity is linked to existential struggles for affordable housing and working space in Amsterdam, such as temporary accommodation, squatting, anti-squatting and some institutional synthesis: “breeding places” Amsterdam.

This film is more than a local documentary on Amsterdam. It explores the latest urban re-/development pattern in advanced Western capitalist cities. The hype around the creative city began already a decade ago, it is global in scope and about to reach its peak. After Richard Florida’s influential book “The Rise of the Creative Class” (2002) creativity has advanced to be the role model of urban regeneration:The New American Dream.

 The whole film is watchable here : http://www.creativecapitalistcity.org/#!prettyPhoto

“Turkish television show fervor reaches western Europe” – Sabah

By Kerim Ülker.

“The recent wind of popularity for Turkish television series in the Middle East, which has increased the advertising market by 35 percent, has now reached Western Europe. Sweden, the symbol of welfare, will soon broadcasting a Turkish television series for the first time ever.

Turkish television series have found increasing popularity in a variety of nations spanning from Croatia to Azerbaijan, the UAE to Kosovo and even in some of Asia’s most distant nations such as Singapore and Vietnam.

The popularity of Turkish television series in the Middle East has also resulted in a significant increase in exports. Turkey, which every year sells 100 television shows to 20 different countries, is aiming to increase the 60 million dollars in exports to 100 million. With their increasing influence in the Arab world, the popularity of Turkish television shows is now beginning to reap results in the economy. Figures from the past 18 months, which include the Arab Spring, are showing that these shows are also making a mark on the advertising market.

THE END IN EUROPE FOR A FIRST

In 2010, there were 81 television shows broadcasted in the region. In 2011, this figure went up to 160. Turkish television series constitute a significant number of the shows running. Lebanese K&Partners TV Services CEO Nabil Kazan says that these Turkish shows played a significant role in the 35 percent increase in the advertising market this period, which reached 14.3 billion dollars.

The recent popularity of Turkish shows in countries such as Russia and Ukraine has now made its way to Western Europe nations. Sweden will soon be broadcasting a Turkish television for the first time ever. Sweden’s state-run Sveriges Television (STV) has signed on to broadcast the ATV show “The End” (Son), marking the first time a Turkish television series will run in Western Europe.

THE END TO SHOW IN SWEDEN

Sweden’s STV, which broadcasts from 16 different channels, holds a 36.3 percent share of ratings. STV, which is also set to host Eurovision 2013, will be releasing “The End” for Swedish viewers in January. Expressing how exciting he finds the show, STV Director Göran Danesten says, “This show is wonderful and will truly leave a unique impression.”

Source : Sabah

 

“Turkish drama ends up in Sweden” – C21 Media

“A Swedish channel has acquired Turkish drama series The End (25×90′) from prodco Ay Yapim and distributor Eccho Rights.

Pubcaster SVT plan to air the series on SVT2 in an access primetime slot in January 2013 as a daily half-hour version. The show originally aired earlier this year on ATV in Turkey.

“We are to be the first major broadcaster in Western Europe to air a series from the vibrant Turkish television drama scene. The End is a great and different addition to our drama slate,” said Göran Danasten, head of fiction at SVT.

The series tells the story of a man who disappears after a plane crash. Eccho Rights is the distribution arm of newly merged Sparks Networks of Sweden and Eccho Media of Benelux.

The SVT sale continues the boom in Turkish drama exports, which have seen series from the Eurasian territory airing across the Balkans, often ousting US imports from schedules there.”

Source : C21 Media

“Zaman: ‘Diziler imamların kontrolünde olsun'” – Sol

Source : Sol

“Zaman gazetesi bu kez dizileri “dini hatalar” yaptığı için hedef gösterdi. Ustura Kemal isimli bir dizide ezanın eksik okunduğunu söyleyerek harekete geçen gazete, “Dizilerde dini konularda hatadan geçilmiyor, ekiplerde uzman şart” başlığıyla hazırladığı haberinde dizi setlerine imam yerleştirilmesi çağrısı yaptı.

TV’de yayınlanan dizilerde alkol kullanılmaması, evlilik dışı ilişkinin bulunmaması, küfür eden polisin olmaması için harcanan çabalara bir yenisi daha eklendi. Zaman gazetesi aracılığıyla dillendirilen hedef, “Dini konularda hata yapan dizilerin imamların elinden geçmesi” oldu.

Dizilerde dini hatalar Zaman’ı çileden çıkardı!

Zaman’dan Neşe Polat’ın haberine göre, Ustura Kemal dizisinde ezanın “Eşhedu Enne Muhammeden Resulullah” kısmının okunmaması Peygamber’in ezandan çıkartılması anlamına geldi. Haberde, “Dizilerin çoğunda böyle hatalar yapılıyor. Birinde imam rükûdan kalkarken ‘Allahu Ekber’ diyor, bir diğerinde ölü kabre konulurken sağ yerine sol tarafına yatırılıyor” ifadeleri kullanıldı.

İlahiyatçı: “Dizilerin dini açıdan uygun olup olmadığı bakılmalı”

Zaman hedef gösterdiği dizi hakkında bir İlahiyatçı’dan da görüş almayı ihmal etmedi. Necmettin Erbakan Üniversitesi İlahiyat Fakültesi Öğretim Üyesi Prof. Dr. Ramazan Altıntaş’ın “Ezan, İslam’ın en önemli şiarlarından birisi” ifadesine yer verilen haberde, ilahiyatçının önerilerine şöyle yer verildi: “Gerek sinema ve tiyatrolarda, gerek televizyonlarımız başta olmak üzere basın-yayın kuruluşlarında, hatta sinema filmleri, dizi ve belgesel yapımlarında mutlaka dinî açıdan uygun olup olmadığı konusunda görüşlerine başvurulacak yüksek din eğitimi almış bir uzmanın istihdam edilmesi büyük önem taşımaktadır.”

Televizyon eleştirmeni: “Televizyon din konusunda eğitici olmalı”

İlahiyatçının görüşlerini almakla yetinmeyen Zaman, bir televizyon eleştirmenine de sorularını yöneltti. Televizyon eleştirmeni Yüksel Aytuğ yaptığı açıklamada, “Televizyon din konusunda eğitici bir vazife yapmalı. Halkın dinî konularda bilinçlenmesi için dizilere önemli misyon düşüyor. Bu sebeple dizilerle işlenen bu konular uzmanların denetiminde yapılmalı. En azından bir danışmandan bilgi alınmalı. Yönetmen, yönetmen yardımcıları ve sanat danışmanları bu konuya özel hassasiyet göstermeli” ifadelerini kullandı.

Dizinin yönetmeni: “Yanlışlık olmuş, özür dilerim”

Ezanı eksik okuttuğu için hedef gösterilen Ustura Kemal dizisinin yönetmeni Mustafa Şevki Doğan’ın da “Teknik bir montaj hatası sonucu oluşmuştur” sözlerini kullanan Zaman, yönetmen Doğan’ın, “’Ezân-ı Muhammedî’m benim için cesedimden önemlidir ve ölene dek önemli olacaktır. Teknik bir montaj hatasından kaynaklanan bu durumun yine dinimizin gereği olan ‘hoşgörü’ çerçevesinde değerlendirilmesini diler, milletimden tüm samimiyetimle özür dilerim” dediğine haberde yer verdi.

Zaman neyi dert edindi?

Dizilerin peşine düştüğü anlaşılan gazete gördüğü “önemli” dini hataları da şöyle sıraladı: “Dizilerdeki dinî hatalar deyince akla ilk Muhteşem Yüzyıl dizisinde geçen sezon yayınlanan Rodos’un fethi bölümündeki şeyhülislamın kıldırdığı namaz sahnesi geliyor. Rükûdan “semiallahü limen hamideh” yerine “Allahu Ekber” diyerek doğruluyorlar. Huzur Sokağı’nda da Feyza karakteri teravih namazı için camiye gidiyor ancak üzerinde şeffaf bir gömlek var ve başörtüsü düzgün bağlı değil. Kurtlar Vadisi’nde ise Polat Alemdar vefat eden can dostu Memati’yi kabre koyarken sağ tarafına değil sol tarafına yatırıyor.”

Source : Sol

“Greeks learn Turkish by watching TV series” – Hürriyet Daily News

Greek television audiences especially enjoy ‘Magnificent Century.’ The famous series is broadcast in Greece under the title ‘The Magnificent Suleiman.’
. Source : Hürriyet

“Turkish television series that are broadcast in different countries are raising interest in Turkish language abroad. While Turkish TV series face many criticisms, they are also boosting interest in Turkish culture and language.

Greek audiences, in particular, have learned a number of Turkish words thanks to the series that are aired in their country. Turkish series such as “Muhteşem Yüzyıl” (Magnificent Century), “Sıla,” “Asi,” “Acı Hayat” (Bitter Life), “Deniz Yıldızı” (Starfish) and “Lale Devri” (Tulip Age) are among those shown in Greece, and Greek people have learned simple words in Turkish from them, such as “Hello,” “How are you?,” “My dear,” and also words like “Okay.”

Audience love Turkish actors

Greek television audiences especially enjoy “Magnificent Century.” The series is broadcast in Greece under the title “The Magnificent Suleiman.” Greek audiences love Turkish actors such as Kenan İmirzalıoğlu, Kıvanç Tatlıtuğ and Beren Saat. Greeks generally say that they do not see very many differences between themselves and Turkish people. They also say the Turkish TV series remind them of family life in their own society.

Greek people learn Turkish words from watching such TV series as “Magnificent Century,” “Asi” and “Sıla,” Kostantina Ilia, the owner of a small restaurant in Athens’ Sintagma Square, told Anatolia news agency.

“I do not know if I will be able to visit Turkey, but I would like to visit the country or take lessons to learn more Turkish words,” she said. “I think all of the actors in Turkish series are very talented,” she said, adding that İmirzalıoğlu is especially popular.

Golden Dawn party leader Nikos Mihaloliakos has some negative ideas about Turkish series, but all Greeks do not agree with his views, Ilia said.

“Turkish series depict strong family relationships,” said Klea Vakifli, working in a café that sells Turkish desserts. “Magnificent Century” and “Sıla” are the Turkish series most watched by Greek viewers, Vakifli said.”

Source : Hürriyet Daily News